Saturday, June 22, 2024

Sunday, March 26

North Cambridge Family Opera’s “The Cutlass Crew” at 1 and 5 p.m. in the auditorium of the Peabody School, 70 Rindge Ave., North Cambridge (and repeating next weekend). $12 for adults; $6 for kids. A North American premiere production of the 2017-commissioned light opera with additional music and scenes, telling the story of English aristocrat-turned-pirate Lady Mary Killigrew menacing the high seas in the time of Queen Elizabeth I. The North Cambridge Family Opera has two intergenerational casts who sing their bright, funny labors of love in English with side titles. Masking is requested. More information is here.

The Lost Recital: Vanessa Moya & Liz Derstine from 1 to 3 p.m. at Lilypad, 1353 Cambridge St., Inman Square. $10. Classical mezzo-soprano Vanessa Moya, with pianist Liz Derstine, planned this show for April 2020 – until the Covid pandemic upended everything. Pieces from Aaron Copland’s “12 Poems of Emily Dickinson” will be performed at moments throughout the concert to highlight that uncertainty, along with selections from Poulenc, Dvořák and Heyduk, and Mark Adamo’s opera of “Little Women.” Information is here.

Amazing Archaeology Fair at Harvard from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, 11 Divinity Ave., in the Baldwin neighborhood near Harvard Square. Adult museum admission is $15. There will be exhibits, discussions with student archaeologists and hands-on activities that include ancient-DNA analysis, animal mummies, King Tut’s throne, spear throwing, flintknapping and other surprises. Information is here.

First Cuba Film Festival from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the Somerville Public Library, 79 Highland Ave., on Central Hill. Free. Information is here.

Cambridge Symphony Orchestra’s “Swayed by Jazz” from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Kresge Auditorium, 48 Massachusetts Ave. $25. Explore the path that brought jazz to Europe and opera to jazz with works by four composers: “Overture to Treemonisha” by Scott Joplin; “Concerto for Cello and Wind Symphony” by Friedrich Gulda, featuring cellist Allison Eldredge; “Lullaby for String Orchestra” by George Gershwin; and “La Mer” by Claude Debussy. Information is here.


Monday, March 27

Fresh Pond nature walk from 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. Free. Meet in the courtyard of the Cambridge Public Library Collins Branch, 64 Aberdeen Ave., West Cambridge, from which park ranger Tim Puopolo walks and talks about what’s growing, changing and blooming in the neighborhood. Information is here.

“In the Liminal Space” graduating student recital by Christina George at 8 p.m. at the Longy School of Music, 27 Garden St., Harvard Square. Free, with registration required and donations of $10 or up welcomed. The young composer presents five works with inspirations as varied as a Margaret Atwood poem, the scenery from an Amtrak train and the last words of a woman hanged as a witch at Salem. Information is here.


Tuesday, March 28

Lessons Learned on the Charles from 3 to 5 p.m. and 6:30 to 8 p.m. at The MIT Museum, 314 Main St., Kendall Square. An event celebrating the Charles River Floating Wetland project. The first part of the day features hands-on activities for all ages with the Charles River Conservancy; later comes a talk on research findings, milestones and results. Information is here.

Soprano Morgan Beckford (via Cambridge Public Libraries)

Sacred Songs and Rituals: Spirituals with soprano Morgan Beckford from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free. Beckford and pianist Alex Morollo explore the tradition of the American spiritual and its origins from the mid-1800s through today with works by composers and arrangers such as Harry T. Burleigh, Hall Johnson, Florence Price, Margaret Bonds and John Carter. (Rescheduled from March 14.) Information is here.

Elements of Cinema series: “Tootsie” at 6 p.m. at The Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle St., Harvard Square. Free. “Boston’s unofficial film school” continues its monthly series of movies presented by guest speakers. This time it’s Sydney Pollack’s 1982 comedy starring Dustin Hoffman and Jessica Lange; Boston University’s Debbie Danielpour educates on film history and – schedule permitting – holds an after-film conversation with the audience. Masks and vaccinations are recommended but not required. Information is here.

The Moth Story Slam from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Tickets are $15. This monthly open-mic storytelling competition is open to anyone who can share a five-minute story on the night’s theme – this time, “Clumsy,” in which participants are asked to tell “about the absence of grace. A poor grasp of language or luggage. Sporting disasters and performing mishaps. Gaffes and bloopers. Epic fumbles or adorable missteps. Accident prone, careless or just unlucky. Note to China Shop: Beware of Bull.” Information is here.

Christine Kenneally reads from “Ghosts of the Orphanage: A Story of Mysterious Deaths, a Conspiracy of Silence and a Search for Justice” at 7 p.m. at the Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square. Free. The journalist explores the terrible true abuse and deaths that took place inside orphanages, centering her story on St. Joseph’s, a Catholic orphanage in Vermont, in conversation with Boston Globe columnist Alex Beam. Well-fitting masks are required. Information is here.

The Residents at 8 p.m. at The Sinclair, 52 Church St., Harvard Square. $38. Icons in the world of experimental music for almost 50 years, these brilliant weirdos have done groundbreaking work in the areas of trance, world fusion, electronica, punk, industrial and lounge music, and are credited with being among the originators of performance art and music videos – some of theirs are in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art. Information is here.


Wednesday, March 29

Cambridge Community Iftar from 6 to 9 p.m. at the King Open School, 850 Cambridge St., Wellington-Harrington. Free, with registration recommended. All are welcome at this evening meal at which Muslims break their fast after sunset during the Holy month of Ramadan. Free halal food will be served by Mughul Catering, and there will be speakers. Information is here.

CelebriTea Book Club from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Somerville Public Library West Branch, 40 College Ave., near Davis Square. Free. A new series spills the metaphorical tea, inviting patrons to read a tell-all celebrity memoir (first is “Open Book” by Jessica Simpson) while drinking the actual beverage. Information is here.

Drag Night at 8 p.m. at Aeronaut Brewing, 14 Tyler St., near Union Square, Somerville. $15 for a 21-plus show. Queens Coleslaw, Severity Stone and Harlow Havoc perform, welcoming newcomer Lilly Rose Valore. Information is here.


Thursday, March 30

National Take a Walk in the Park Day: The Signs of Spring from noon to 1:30 p.m. starting at 250 Fresh Pond Parkway, in West Cambridge at Fresh Pond. A ranger-led walk shakes off feelings of winter and welcomes the vernal equinox, exploring how to observe the signs of spring in the reservation with all senses. Information is here.

Harvard Art Museums at Night from 5 to 9 p.m. at the Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., near Harvard Square. Free. Wander the galleries, mingle in the Calderwood Courtyard, chat over a snack or drink and browse the shop. Information is here.

ArtsThursdays: Light Up the Museums from 5 to 9 p.m. at the Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford St., and the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, 11 Divinity Ave., both in the Baldwin neighborhood near Harvard Square. Free. Enjoy the exhibits with mocktails by CraftHouse Bartending, desserts in the galleries and museum-themed crafts. There’s a photo booth for the occasion and light-up lounge chairs. Information is here.

Family game night from 6 to 8 p.m. at Somerville Public Library East Branch, 115 Broadway. Free. All ages are invited to play the library’s games or bring a favorite from home. (And anyone may participate.) Information is here.

Poets David Baker and Page Hill Starzinger read at 7 p.m. at the Grolier Poetry Book Shop on 6 Plympton St., Harvard Square. $5. The poets read after an introduction by Martha Collins.. Masks are required for the duration of the event. Proof of vaccination is requested at the door. Information is here.

Soprano Fatma Said. (Photo: Askonas Holt)

Debut Series with soprano Fatma Said at 8 p.m. at the Longy School of Music, 27 Garden St., Harvard Square. $55. The Celebrity series hosts Egypt’s Said and Spanish guitarist Rafael Aguirre, connecting cultures in local recital debuts. Information is here.


Friday, March 31

Bruce Schneier reads from “A Hacker’s Mind: How the Powerful Bend Society’s Rules and How to Bend them Back ” at 6 p.m. at the Harvard Science Center, 1 Oxford St., near Harvard Square. Free. Cybersecurity expert Schneier takes hacking out of the world of computing and uses it to analyze the systems underpinning society from tax laws to politics, revealing people whose hacks bend our economic, political and legal systems to their advantage at the expense of everyone else. He’ll be in conversation with Boston Globe tech reporter and columnist Hiawatha Bray. Information is here.

Lizzie Stark reads from “Egg: A Dozen Ovatures” at 7 p.m. at the Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square. Free. Stark explores the egg as a symbol and useful object through its natural and cultural history, from the dishes of chef Jacques Pépin to attempts at pysanky, the Ukrainian art of egg decoration. She’ll be in conversation with Molly Birnbaum, editor in chief of Ten Speed Press. Well-fitting masks are required. Information is here.

Eventual Cabaret at 7:30 p.m. at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free. Dance, live music, circus, PowerPoint presentations and maybe wrestling that showcases the Eventual Dance Co. Information is here.

“Bells at Dusk” diploma performance by Tyler James from 8 to 10 p.m. at the Longy School of Music, 27 Garden St., Harvard Square. Free, with registration required and donations of $10 or up welcomed. The cellist performs Rachmaninoff, Mendelssohn, Chacon and Rossini with Mana Tokuno and Ian Saunders. Information is here.

John Vale: Magician from 8 to 10 p.m. at Lilypad, 1353 Cambridge St., Inman Square. $15. Boston magician Vale blends close-up illusions and feats of mentalism for audiences 12 and up. Information is here.


Saturday, April 1

Discover Mount Auburn walking tour from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Saturday at Mount Auburn Cemetery, 580 Mount Auburn St., West Cambridge. $10. Mount Auburn is a National Historic Landmark and the final resting place of nearly 100,000 people – including famous ones such as poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter and cookbook author Fannie Farmer – along with being home to 700 species and varieties of trees, beautiful sculpture and landscaping and gloriously gloomy tombs and mausoleums. This 1.5-mile walking tour focuses on history, monuments and the lives of the buried. Information is here.

North Cambridge Family Opera’s “The Cutlass Crew.” (Photo: North Cambridge Family Opera via Facebook)

North Cambridge Family Opera’s “The Cutlass Crew” (continued) at 3 and 7 p.m. in the auditorium of the Peabody School, 70 Rindge Ave., North Cambridge (and repeating Sunday). $12 for adults; $6 for kids. Masking is requested. More information is here.

Imagine Orchestra performance at 8 p.m. at the Longy School of Music, 27 Garden St., Harvard Square. Free, with registration required and donations of $10 or up welcomed. The chamber jazz ensemble-in-residence and students perform Bill Banfield, whose works have been commissioned by orchestras and performed by artists such as Bobby McFerrin and Nnenna Freelon. Information is here.

“Tyaka” dance at 8 to 9:30 p.m. at The Dance Complex, 536 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square (and repeating Sunday). A celebration of Haitian folkloric culture and rhythms – “Tyaka” is a Haitian hodgepodge stew associated with festivities and family time – by Jean Appolon Expressions. Information is here.

“The Jangling Man: The Martin Newell Story” screening from 8 to 10 p.m. at Lilypad, 1353 Cambridge St., Inman Square. $12. U.K.-based artist, poet and Cleaners from Venus frontman Martin Newell gets his due as an influential figure in the history of cassette culture and DIY recording, as well as an integral part of the British music scene since the 1970s. Information is here.

Suitcase Stories at 8:15 p.m. at Somerville Theatre, 55 Davis Square. $28. Foreign and U.S.-born residents share stories of refugee and immigrant life, exposing the complexity of immigrant experiences through personal narrative. Information is here.


Sunday, April 2

No Frills All Fun Swap from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Multicultural Arts Center, 41 Second St., East Cambridge. $5 to $20. Bring as many as 15 unwanted items to swap for as many things as you do want. (There are onsite repairs offered, but not for free.) Information is here.

North Cambridge Family Opera’s “The Cutlass Crew” (continued) at 1 and 5 p.m. in the auditorium of the Peabody School, 70 Rindge Ave., North Cambridge (and repeating next weekend). $12 for adults; $6 for kids. Masking is requested. More information is here.

“Close” screens from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., near Harvard Square. Free. In Lukas Dhont’s PG-13 winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, Leo and Remi are 13-year-olds whose seemingly unbreakable bond is suddenly torn apart, making for what’s been called an emotionally transformative portrait of friendship and love, identity and independence, and heartbreak and healing. Information is here.

“Tyaka” dance (continued) at 7 to 8:30 p.m. at The Dance Complex, 536 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square. Information is here.

“Curious Soundscapes” at 8 p.m. at the Longy School of Music, 27 Garden St., Harvard Square. Free, with registration required and donations of $10 or up welcomed. A blend of baroque period instruments with modern, digital, audio-reactive visualizations led by harpsichordist and organist Vivian Montgomery with members of the Historical Performance Faculty. Information is here.