Sunday, Nov. 13

“The Moving Wall” Vietnam Veterans Memorial around the clock at the Great Lawn at Assembly Row, 399 Revolution Drive, Somerville. Free. This is the final day of a visit by a half-sized replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Grief counselors and volunteers will be present to help visitors 24 hours a day. Information is here.

Indoor soapbox rally from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the CambridgeSide mall, 100 CambridgeSide Place, East Cambridge. Free. A good, old-fashioned rally on a hill (in an underground parking garage) for a competition for fastest homemade car relying on gravity to move. Information is here.

Nature in the City Festival from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Magazine Beach Park Nature Center, at the river end of Magazine Street in the Cambridgeport neighborhood. Free. The last in a series of monthly festivals timed to coincide with the full moon that celebrate the community, connect with the nature of the park and offer meals from a food truck and live music. Nature-based games and activities, art-making and community workshops are suitable for all ages. Information is here.

A work from the Feet of Clay Pottery Studios which is donating items to a Smash the Patriarchy fundraiser Sunday. (Photo: Feet of Clay Pottery Studio via Facebook)

Smash the Patriarchy! Abortion Fundraiser from 3 to 6 p.m. at Aeronaut Brewing, 14 Tyler St., near Union Square, Somerville. Tickets are $15. People who are angry about threats to reproductive justice and abortion rights can come smash pottery to raise money for abortion funds. The base fee buys three pieces of smashable pottery donated from the Indigo Fire and Feet of Clay Pottery Studios, with additional pieces at $5 each. Information is here.


Monday, Nov. 14

Jessica Lander. (Photo: Julian Viviescas)

Jessica Lander reads from “Making Americans: Stories of Historic Struggles, New Ideas and Inspiration in Immigrant Education” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square. Free. Lander has anecdotes that bring to life the history of America’s efforts to educate immigrants – or defeat those efforts – and ideas for educators and policymakers. She will be in conversation with Priya Tahiliani, superintendent of Everett Public Schools. Well-fitting masks are required. Information is here.

Write Science: Born in Cambridge from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at The MIT Museum, 314 Main St., Kendall Square. Free, but registration is recommended due to limited seating. A panel ponders how Cambridge has been home to such a surprisingly large number of innovative people and ideas across fields as varied as literature, social reform, the candy industry, computer technology, genetics and popular culture, inspired by Karen Weintraub and Michael Kuchta’s book “Born in Cambridge: 400 Years of Ideas and Innovators.” Information is here.


Tuesday, Nov. 15

Inside Stories: Development of the Covid Vaccine in Record Time from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at The MIT Museum, 314 Main St., Kendall Square. Free, but registration is recommended due to limited seating. Melissa Moore of Moderna and Dan Barouch of the Harvard Medical Schools talk about the record-breaking pace of Covid vaccine development and look to what’s next, from new variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus to monkeypox. A reception follows. Information is here.


Wednesday, Nov. 16

Songwriting with the Lilly Jazz Project from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Cambridge library’s O’Neill Branch, 70 Rindge Ave., North Cambridge. Free. Participants will explore song-writing from start to finish, hearing how original lyrics can come to life in song and spoken word and getting a chance to share their work. Information is here.

Anne Winkler-Morey. (Photo: Eric Mueller)

Book talk about “Allegiance to Winds and Waters: Bicycling the Political Divides of the United States” benefiting Bikes Not Bombs from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Lamplighter Brewing, 284 Broadway, The Port. Free, but Bikes Not Bombs gets $10 for every book sold at this 21-plus event. Minneapolis author and bicyclist Anne Winkler-Morey rode the 12,000-mile contiguous perimeter of the United States and emerged with this personal-political memoir advocating for solidarity across all kinds of borders. Information is here.

Eileen Myles reads from “Pathetic Literature” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square. Free. Poet Myles compiled 106 pieces into an anthology resetting the word “pathetic” to its original meaning of inspiring emotion or feeling. She will be in conversation with contributors Ama Birch, Tom Cole, Fanny Howe, Porsha Olayiwola, Abe Rybeck and Liev Xue to create “a swarming taxonomy of ways to think differently and live pathetically on a polarized and fearful planet.” Well-fitting masks are required. Information is here.


Thursday, Nov. 17

Renee McLeod. (Photo: History Cambridge)

Pies with Petsi: A Fundraiser for History Cambridge with Renee McLeod from from 6 to 8 p.m. at 26 Hubbard Park Road, West Cambridge. Tickets are $60, limited to 25 people. The local baker and founder of Petsi Pies – she retired in February 2021, passing the store on to Jill Remby – will show how to make some pie classics for the upcoming holiday season. There will be light hors d’oeuvres, a one-hour demonstration with recipes, and tastings during a Q&A. Information is here.

Robert Pinsky reads at 7 p.m. at the Grolier Poetry Book Shop, 6 Plympton St., Harvard Square. Free, but registration is required. The famed poet reads, with an introduction by Maggie Dietz, former assistant poetry editor for Slate and director of the Favorite Poem Project –  founded by Pinsky during his terms as U.S. poet laureate. Proof of vaccination and masks are required. Information is here.

Symbolism of the American Dollar from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Acropolis Boston, on the second floor of 2000 Massachusetts Ave., Porter Square. Free. An exploration of all the weird icons and symbols on our currency, with UN World Philosophy Day as a pretext for an event by New Acropolis, an organization that says it promotes love of wisdom and respect for human dignity beyond racial, sexual, cultural, religious, social and other differences. Information is here.

Third Thursdays jazz series at 8 p.m. at Harvard-Epworth United Methodist Church, 1555 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square. Admission is $10. This harmolodic jazz series by Dave Bryant, a keyboardist and composer who worked with Ornette Coleman, brings in bassist Frederick Williams, percussionist James Kamal Jones and trumpeter and bass clarinetist Matt Lavelle. Information is here.


Friday, Nov. 18

Walter Sickert & the Army of Broken Toys’ “Something Strange.” (Photo: Crystal Ballroom via Twitter)

“Something Strange,” a live music and dance tribute to “The Nightmare Before Christmas,” at 8 p.m. at Somerville Theatre’s Crystal Ballroom, 55 Davis Square (and continuing Saturday). General admission is $12, and table seating is $22. The band Walter Sickert & the Army of Broken Toys presents a holiday theater experience – open to all ages with a warning that it comes with “partial nudity and suggestive situations.” Information is here.

“T: An MBTA Musical” from 9:30 to 11:30 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. General admission is $29 for this 21-plus show. There’s new relevancy for this snarky play by John Michael Manship (book) and Melissa Carubia (music and lyrics), in which three 20-somethings whose lives have been derailed by the MBTA’s incompetency discover a secret map that will enable them to overthrow the transit system’s corruption. Songs include “The Shuttle Bus Song (We Can’t Handle It),” “The People on the T” and “The Bro Song.” All aboard, with masks. Information is here.

Kallembach’s “Antigone” and Bach’s “Phoebus und Pan” at 8 p.m. at the Longy School of Music, 27 Garden St., Harvard Square (and continuing Saturday). Free, but registration is required. An unlikely pairing directed by R. Lee Kratzer and conducted by Ryan Turner examines cycles of history and mythology, drawing a line from the ancient to the present day on themes of integrity, fate and free will, and how societies function after upheaval and disaster. It comes with a content warning about discussion and depiction of war and warfare, death of family members, references to World War II and the Holocaust, and other conflicts past and present. Information is here.


Saturday, Nov. 19

Brickbottom artist Bashar Attar works in copper. (Photo: Bashar Attar via Instagram)

Brickbottom/Joy Street Open Studios from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 1 Fitchburg St. and 86 Joy St., Inner Belt, Somerville (and continuing Sunday). Free. interactive installations and pop-up performances enhance the chance to browse and buy art. Information is here.

“Something Strange,” a live music and dance tribute to “The Nightmare Before Christmas” continued) at 3 and 8 p.m. at Somerville Theatre’s Crystal Ballroom, 55 Davis Square (and continuing Saturday). General admission is $12, and table seating is $22. Matinee information is here; evening show information is here.

Esh Circus Arts student showcase at 7 p.m. at The Center for Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. General admission is $22 (or $24.81 with service fees). Aerial stunts, group acrobatics, athletic dancing and clowning in a showcase of student talent. Information is here.

Kallembach’s “Antigone” and Bach’s “Phoebus und Pan” (continued) at 8 p.m. at the Longy School of Music, 27 Garden St., Harvard Square (and continuing Saturday). Free, but registration is required. Information is here.

Smoke & Shadows: Burlesque and Variety Show from 9:30 to 11:30 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. Tickets are $28 for this 21-plus show. Vaudeville, music and comedy, all studded with rhinestones in a monthly show that defies decade and genre, each time offering a mix of performers from near and far. Masks are required. Information is here.


Sunday, Nov. 20

Boston’s Maison Green is among Holiday Plant Enthusiast Market vendors. (Photo: Maison Green)

Holiday Plant Enthusiast Market from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at The Center for Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free. Nearly 40 local artists and small businesses will sell plant-related goods around speakers, raffles and an anonymous plant swap table (give a plant, take a plant). Information is here.

Brickbottom/Joy Street Open Studios (continued) from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 1 Fitchburg St. and 86 Joy St., Inner Belt, Somerville. Free. Information is here.

“Let It Bleed” tribute at 7 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. Tickets are $18.03. Once Somerville presents a show that’s like seeing The Rolling Stones performing one of their best albums at a small venue. Scream Along with Billy, The Garage Dogs and “a cavalcade of local stars” perform. Information is here.

“Stages of Life” graduating student recital at 8 p.m. at the Longy School of Music, 27 Garden St., Harvard Square (and continuing Saturday). Free, but a donation of $10 or more is welcome. Pianist Yizixin An shows off what’s been learned as student of the famed Renana Gutman. Information is here.