Mayor David Maher visits one of the city’s 12 schools for K-8 students.

The June 3 commencement ceremonies for Cambridge Rindge & Latin School, its 33rd, was not just the start of Cambridge graduation season. It also marked Mayor David Maher’s achieving his goal of visiting each Cambridge Public School. (The high school, which he visited Wednesday morning, was the last on the list.)

Maher said he was impressed.

“I am struck by the improvements that are taking place structurally, curriculum- and atmosphere-wise, not to mention that this group of kids is fortunate to reap the benefits of brand-new facilities,” Maher said, citing the neighboring Cambridge Main Library, war memorial and “school building to be.”

This was the first year the district was overseen by Superintendent Jeffrey Young, who was recruited from Newton and has restructured how the district operates, adding priorities while cutting staff and the overall budget. His efforts to creating a middle school was put on hold this year, although shorter-term goals addressing the needs of kids of middle-school age are still being worked through.

Cambridge has 12 schools serving K-8 students, and at the high school level there is a separate ninth-grade campus and the High School Extension Program, a smaller, nontraditional school.

Maher is chairman of the School Committee and a former member. His terms ended in1999 when he was elected to the City Council. “It’s been some time since I have visited and been in the schools. I’ve enjoyed immersing myself once again with students and visiting their classrooms,” he said. “Across the board I’ve seen engaged children and enthusiastic, committed faculty.”

He specifically cited his visit to a second-level class in a new Arabic language program, a bilingual pre-algebra class and a Junior English class.

Schools are a significant part of the social fabric of the city and play a role in supporting students, families and neighborhoods, he said.

This post includes information from a press release.