A screen capture shows the idea behind zoomatlas.com, one of the Web startups presented Monday at the Web Innovations Group meetup in Kendall Square.

A screen capture shows the idea behind zoomatlas.com, one of the Web startups presented Monday at the Web Innovations Group meetup in Kendall Square.

The buzz at Monday’s Web Innovators Group gathering went to thredup.com, a clothing exchange reminding people “You don’t wear 25 percent of the clothes in your closet — join thredUP and start exchanging them for some that you will!”

“Ton of murmuring after thredUP presentation,” tweeted Doug Haslam, of Shift Communications. “They liked it?”

“Have to admit I wasn’t expecting to care about thredUP, but I think they’re onto something, especially when they launch for kids,” wrote Scott Centurino, another Web Innovations attendee. (The thredUP team wasn’t saying when the kids’ exchange was to begin, but it will start with ages zero to 12 and allow trading between different sizes. “Kids grow up so fast!” the site points out.)

Next lower on the buzz scale was zoomatlas.com, which says it’s “Mapping every square inch of America” and was described by one person at the Web Innovation meetup, at Cambridge’s Royal Sonesta hotel in Kendall Square, as “geo-tagging your memories.” Users find locations that have been meaningful to them, such as the house where they grew up, tag it (“I was here”) and let it go to work (“I’m looking for …”) seeking other people with relationships to the site, such as neighbors or the family who moved in afterward.

Straggling a bit in buzz Monday among three main presentations was surveyonthespot.com, which is exactly what it sounds like — a mostly mobile application that provides instant feedback to restaurants, retail stores and the like and offers coupons in return. “Awesome tool,” tweeted David Gowel, at the time president and chief executive of Cambridge marketing firm Clearly Creative and now with social media adviser Rocktech, while others said the site was “cool, but needs more.” Haslam suggested it be paired with Foursquare, a mobile app that uses mobile phones’ global positioning abilities to tell users when friends are nearby and suggest places for them to go.

One estimate put the number of attendees Monday at 1,200, significantly higher than a meetup during the summer.

Survey on the Spot defied the buzz, however — a blow for Twitter crowdsourcing! — and won the people’s choice award among the three “main dishes” presented Monday.

This post was updated Feb. 15, 2011, to update Gowel’s employment.