Monday

bullet-gray-small Cambridge Comedy Underground Television Taping from 7 to 9 p.m. at Cambridge Community Television, 438 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square. Free, but seating is limited, so make a reservation. The channel’s television comedy showcase includes sets from Lisa Lang, Jason Cordova, Dame F.K. (pictured), Aaron “Tiny” Smith, Michelle Sui, Jack Hall and Peter Martin, college performer Jeremiah Broderick, mystery performers and hosts Demetrius “Big D” Hullum and Casey McNeal. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small CatVideoFest from 7 to 10 p.m. at Landmark Kendall Square Cinema, 355 Binney St., Kendall Square. Tickets are $15. A compilation of the latest and best cat videos culled from countless hours of unique submissions and sourced animations, music videos and, of course, the Internet to raise money for cats in need through partnerships with local charities. Information is here.


Tuesday

bullet-gray-small “Harry Potter and the Sacred Text” podcast from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Kresge Little Theater in Kresge Auditorium, 48 Massachusetts Ave. Free. A behind-the-scenes look at the hit podcast with co-host Vanessa Zoltan and producer Ariana Nedelman. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Judith” opera workshop presentation from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s W97 Theater, 345 Vassar St., Area II. Free, but register here. Drawn from an Anglo-Saxon epic fragment by visiting artist Karin Coonrod, with a text sung and spoken by MIT students and professional singers in Anglo-Saxon and modern English rooted in Anglo-Saxon. The opera’s composer and musical director is Paul Vasile. Information is here.


Wednesday

bullet-gray-small “In Between” one-person show by Ibrahim Miari from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Jackson Lab at Aidekman Arts Center at Tufts University, 40 Talbot Ave., Somerville. Free. A semi-autobiographical show that uses Miari’s skills as a dancer, puppeteer, actor and mime to portray the complexities, contradictions and even humor inherent in Palestinian-Israeli identity. “It is a low-key, unpretentious performance, no high drama, just a series of flawless impersonations,”  said Helen Epstein in The Arts Fuse. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small The Berklee Popular Music Institute Live from 7 to 11 p.m. at The Sinclair, 52 Church St., Harvard Square. Tickets are $5. Performers including Goldspace & Trey Kams, Roy Juno, Jackie Foster, Jobi, Alx and Mkultra have been selected to represent Berklee on the festival circuit, but before they hit Lollapalooza, Governors Ball, Outside Lands, Essence, Osheaga and Country Lake Shake, they’re hitting the Sinclair. Information is here.


Thursday

bullet-gray-small Weird Local Film Festival #8 from 7 to 10 p.m. at Warehouse XI, 11 Sanborn Court, Union Square, Somerville. There’s a suggested donation of $5 for this 18-plus show. There are nearly 30 short works from “filmmakers in reasonable proximity to Somerville” on the tentative schedule for this semi-regular screening event. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Darker Joys” art reception from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Cambridge Art Association’s Kathryn Schultz Gallery, 25 Lowell St., West Cambridge. Free. Artists Katie Lane, Keith MacLelland, Stephanie Todhunter (her work, pictured) and Amantha Tsaros invite you to revel in your base human instincts, celebrating excess with a fearless exploration of medium and subject and an eagerness to surprise the viewer. “Push the red button! Grab the last cookie! All the fun with none of the consequences,” curators suggest. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Mr. Burns: A Post Electric Play” from 8 to 10:30 p.m. (and repeating Friday and Saturday) in the Balch Arena Theater at the Aidekman Arts Center at Tufts University, 40 Talbot Ave., Somerville. Pay what you can. This clever and thoughtful Anne Washburn play was just here in November, but is welcome back any time: The action (directed here by Jonah Greene) takes place after a nuclear apocalypse, and survivors remember the past by retelling an old episode of “The Simpsons” that morphs as the decades pass, speaking to how culture evolves over time. Information is here.


Friday

bullet-gray-small “Breaking Ground” pop-up art exhibit at MIT’s Central Utilities Plant from 6 to 8:30 p.m. (and repeating Saturday) at 59 Vassar St., Area II. Free. Artist Valery Lyman exhibits from four years of audio and photographs taken in the Bakken region of North Dakota, where she documented the rise of the oil industry and migration that went with it – projecting in and on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology plant that provides electricity, steam heat and cooling to 100-plus campus buildings. The two-day popup reveals not just the art, but a rarely seen part of the city. And perhaps it goes without saying that this is the first time the plant has hosted an art exhibit. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Suspiria” then and now from 7 to 11:45 p.m. at The Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle St., Harvard Square. Double feature tickets are $12. A mini “Suspiria” film fest of sorts, showing the 1977 Dario Argento original and Luca Guadagnino’s 2018 reimagining. Both versions of the witch covenant parading as a dance school psychodrama are stylish and creepy, with directorial styles that remain unique and distinct. It’s as if a great classic rock song got a great cover. (These are also the Brattle’s first shows after a weeklong bathroom renovation. Enjoy!) (Contributed by Tom Meek.) Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Moon Over Dark Street” dramatic cabaret from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. (and repeating Saturday and Sunday) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s W97 Theater, 345 Vassar St., Area II. General admission is $20. Theater and music by Bertolt Brecht, Elizabeth Hauptman, Kurt Weill and Hanns Eisler featuring jazz-hot tunes that emerged during the decline of the Weimar Republic and rise of Adolph Hitler – songs of love, sex and agitation that resonate with today’s political scene. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Bring Us Your Women: An Arts Odyssey” at 8 p.m. at the Somerville Theatre, 55 Davis Square. Tickets are $20 (with fees, $27.70). The international collaborative film anthology with live music, poetry and dance returns to explore stories of historic and mythical female ancient figures, this time featuring the works of 40 artists from eight countries. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Mr. Burns: A Post Electric Play” from 8 to 10:30 p.m. (and repeating Saturday) in the Balch Arena Theater at the Aidekman Arts Center at Tufts University, 40 Talbot Ave., Somerville. Tickets are $8. Information is here.


Saturday

bullet-gray-small “Real Women Have Curves” from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. (and repeating three times through March 15 with tickets available) at the Loeb Experimental Theater, 64 Brattle St., Harvard Square. Free, but reserve tickets before they’re gone; some shows have already sold out. Josefina López’s comedy about immigration, beauty, weight and female worth is directed by Bianca Rodriguez. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Issues on Issues” comics conversation from 7 to 9 p.m. at Comicazi, 407 Highland Ave., Davis Square, Somerville. Free, but donations are encouraged. The Ladies of Comicazi look at how comics push the envelope on story-telling and social issues, focusing on Ms. Marvels and Captain Marvels through the years just as Marvel Comics’ “Captain Marvel” hits theaters. There will be a gallery showing of key issues of the series as well as a panel discussion. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Tribute” by the Radius Ensemble from 8 to 10 p.m. at the Longy School of Music’s Pickman Hall, 27 Garden St., Harvard Square. General admission is $25. The centerpiece here is composer Valerie Coleman’s interweaving of music with selections from Langston Hughes poetry in “Portraits of Langston,”  narrated by Regie Gibson, but there’s also Maurice Ravel’s “Le Tombeau de Couperin” for wind quintet, in which every movement was dedicated to the memory of a fallen friend; Joan Tower’s lyrical “Red Maple,” scored for bassoon and strings; and “Woodscrossing” for oboe, cello and piano by Stephany Svorinić, winner of the Pappalardo Composition Competition. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small David Champagne “Agnostic Gospel II” show and video shoot from 8 to 10 p.m. at A Curated World by Kay McGowan, 160 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free. Champagne was in Treat Her Right, which spawned Morphine, but its blues-punk sound is just one aspect of what’s on stage to celebrate an album titled “Bad Choices Make Good Stories.” Footage of this show will go into a video; extra credit for wearing a mask or disguise. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small The 12th Annual Herb Pomeroy Memorial Concert from 8 to 10 p.m. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Kresge Auditorium, 48 Massachusetts Ave. General admission is $10. You don’t need to have known MIT’s “Father of Jazz” to enjoy this concert combining the MIT Festival Jazz Ensemble, MIT Alumni Jazz Band and guest artist Sean Jones on trumpet. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Breaking Ground” pop-up art exhibit at MIT’s Central Utilities Plant from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at 59 Vassar St., Area II. Free. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Mr. Burns: A Post Electric Play” from 7 to 9:30 p.m. (and repeating Saturday) in the Balch Arena Theater at the Aidekman Arts Center at Tufts University, 40 Talbot Ave., Somerville. Tickets are $8. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Moon Over Dark Street” dramatic cabaret from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. (and repeating Sunday) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s W97 Theater, 345 Vassar St., Area II. General admission is $20. Information is here.


Sunday

bullet-gray-small Magnus Johnstone “Larger Works & More” panel discussion and opening reception from 1:30 to 5 p.m. at the The Nave Gallery, 155 Powderhouse Blvd., near Teele Square, Somerville. Free. Johnstone, a trailblazing radio DJ from the 1970s through the 1990s (on WZBC 90.3 FM and WMBR 88.1 FM) was also a visual artist. He died in 2013, and his family is mounting exhibitions to raise money to preserve his dozens of trippy, occasionally disturbing and always surprising works. This show, up through March 17, starts with a 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. panel discussion about Magnus’ life in Boston, hosted by friends Mark Flynn, Michael Shores and Chris Guttmacher, and exploring his associations with the Punkt/Data Gallery, Skunk Piss Magazine and Gallery East. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Moon Over Dark Street” dramatic cabaret from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s W97 Theater, 345 Vassar St., Area II. General admission is $20. Information is here.

bullet-gray-small “Real Women Have Curves” from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. (and repeating three times through March 15 with tickets available) at the Loeb Experimental Theater, 64 Brattle St., Harvard Square. Free, but reserve tickets before they’re gone; some shows have already sold out. Information is here.