Sunday, April 21, 2024

Sunday, Oct. 30

Participants meet at a SomerStreets Monster Mash. (Photo: KrisNM via Flickr)

SomerStreets: Monster Mash from 2 to 6 p.m. on Somerville Avenue from Union Square to Park Street. Free. A fun, themed take on the international Open Streets concept, which closes busy city streets to vehicles and opens them up for cycling, walking, dancing, running and other activities. Activities include dancing to live music, a costumed parade led by the School of Honk, street performers doing magic and acrobatics, pumpkin carving, games and more. Information is here.

“Before, During and After” dance at 8 p.m. at The Dance Complex@Canal, 650 E. Kendall St., Kendall Square (and continuing through Sunday). General admission is $25. Tony Rizzi and the Bad Habits give an unconventional lecture-performance about the Ballet Frankfurt and its legendary director, William Forsythe – who once said, “I have a company of comedians who can dance really well.” Information is here.

Wizard Fest interactive fantasy-themed party at 7 p.m. at The Middle East Downstairs, 480 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square. General admission is $15. This all-ages event features wizard-themed drinks, a costume contest, trivia and games as well as DJ’d dancing. Information is here.


Monday, Oct. 31

AntiMorris and Autumn Sing from 4:45 to 6 p.m. at the Somerville Community Growing Center, 22 Vinal Ave., near Union Square, Somerville. The AntiMorris is danced annually at sunset on Oct. 31 to mark the turning of the year and help make the frost flowers bloom; the singing of autumn tunes around it are a plus. Information is here.

Hawkins Halloween from 5 to 11 p.m. at A4cade by Area Four, 292 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridgeport near Central Square. Free. Dress as a character from “Stranger Things” and attend the Snow Ball in the Upside Down, dancing to a 1980s soundtrack by DJ Frank White with breaks for drag performances by Missy Steak, a costume contest and specialty cocktails. Information is here.

Tim Curry, Brian Bostwick and Susan Sarandon in “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.”

“The Rocky Horror Picture Show” at 8 p.m. at The Center for Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. A limited number of $25 tickets will be available at the door for this otherwise sold-out event; doors are at 7 p.m. This is the midnight-show experience with costumes and callbacks, led by a troupe of cult-movie pros called the Teseracte Players. Information is here.


Tuesday, Nov. 1

Somerville Halloween Party & Pub Sing from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Somerville Community Growing Center, 22 Vinal Ave., near Union Square, Somerville. Free. Costumes, spooky songs, and snacks are encouraged and mulled cider is expected to complement the usual drinking songs, sea chanteys and the like. Information is here.

Vanessa A. Bee. (Photo: David Norwood)

Vanessa A. Bee reads from “Home Bound: An Uprooted Daughter’s Reflections on Belonging” at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Porter Square Books, 25 White St., Porter Square. The essayist will be in conversation with Nora Caplan-Bricker, executive editor at Jewish Currents magazine. Read Bee’s interview with Alma Barak about this debut memoir. Information is here.

Smut Slam from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at The Center for Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. There’s a $10 suggested donation at the door for this 18-plus show. Real-life, first-person sex stories from eight to 10 tellers drawn at random, competing for the best five-minute tale of debauchery before a panel of local celebrities. They can’t use notes, props or hate speech – but pretty much anything else goes. “Stories are often funny and/or epic wins, but we want to encourage people to consider sharing their sad, disturbing, poignant, serious, simple and/or ’fail’ experiences too,” organizers say. Lucas Brooks hosts. Information is here.


Wednesday, Nov. 2

A reading of T.S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free. Poets Lloyd Schwartz, Martha Collins, George Kalogeris, Suzanne Mercury and David Gullette celebrate the poem’s publication 100 years ago, introduced by Michael Todd Steffen. Information is here.

The New York Cat Film Festival plays Kendall Square. (Image: The New York Cat Film Festival)

Fifth Annual New York Cat Film Festival at 7 p.m. at Landmark Kendall Square Cinema, 355 Binney St. Tickets are $15. Sixteen shorts ranging from the one-minute animated “Cat Fight” to the 20-minute documentary “Cats of Malta.” A part of every ticket purchase price goes to a local animal welfare nonprofit. Information is here.

Brewery Book Club from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Lamplighter Brewing, 284 Broadway, The Port. Free. Lamplighter and the Cambridge Public Library team up to highlight contemporary works from marginalized voices in this series taking place in the brewery’s back taproom. (Craft brews are, of course, for sale.) This time the book is “Moon of the Crusted Snow” by Waubgeshig Rice, set in a rural Anishinaabe community in northern Canada where community members are cut off from the rest of the world amid a societal collapse. Readers can expect to discuss what they learned from the book and were touched by. Information is here.


Thursday, Nov. 3

Renee Dudley and Daniel Golden read from “The Ransomware Hunting Team: A Band of Misfits’ Improbable Crusade to Save the World from Cybercrime” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square. Free. ProPublica reporters Dudley and Golden tell the story of a ragtag, mostly self-taught team working without pay to rescue those the FBI can’t or won’t from the cyber scourge of our time: ransomware attacks. Well-fitting masks are required. Information is here.

Radium Ensemble musicians at the end of a May concert. (Image: Radium Ensemble via Facebook)

Radius Ensemble “Trailblazers” concert at 8 p.m. at the Longy School of Music, 27 Garden St., Harvard Square. Free, but registration is required. This ensemble-in-residence highlights National Native American Heritage Month in a concert featuring the world premiere of “Chahta Aiasha (Choctaw Places)” for oboe and strings by Boston-based composer and Choctaw tribe member Charles Shadle; “Wake Your Wild Voice” (2008) for bassoon and cello by Judith Weir; “Roaring Fork” for wind quintet by Eric Ewazen; and Debussy’s early Piano Trio in G Major. Masks are required. Information is here.

Songwriter Night at the Plough at 10 p.m. at The Plough & Stars, 912 Massachusetts Ave., Riverside. Admission is free for this 21-plus show. Solo acoustic sets from Jane Park, Bridget Nault and Ashley Rhodes. Information is here.


Friday, Nov. 4

Ahmed Badr. (Photo: Ahmed Badr)

“While the Earth Sleeps We Travel: Stories, Poetry and Art from Young Refugees Around the World” book talk and performance from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. in the Elliot Lyman Room of Longfellow Hall at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, 13 Appian Way, Harvard Square. Free, but registration is suggested. Author Ahmed Badr and Narratio Fellowship members Alaa Laila, Nidaa Aljabbarin and Reshma Bista read in an event co-sponsored by the Grolier Poetry Book Shop. Information is here.

The Flow Show at 6:30 p.m. at The Center for Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. General admission is $25 (with online fees, $28.16). Disciplines from juggling to hula hooping are blended with dance and theater in this traveling show. Information is here.

Divas Live concert from 8 to 10 p.m. at the Multicultural Arts Center, 41 Second St., East Cambridge. General admission is $35 (with online fees, $38.77). If you never got to see Ella Fitzgerald live, Gabrielle Goodman will embody them, along with Wayne Shorter (performed by Dominique Eade) and Roberta Flack and Carole King (performed by Farayi Malek). Presented by the Cambridge Jazz Foundation. Information is here.=

“Macbeth” at 8 p.m. at Unity Somerville, 6 William St., just off College Avenue near Davis Square, Somerville. Tickets are $20 (with online fees, $22.69, continuing through Sunday and returning next week). Loyal solder Macbeth listens to the voices of greed and power, resulting in murder and ruin. The Shakespearean tragedy is adapted and directed by Shelley MacAskill. Information is here.

“T: An MBTA Musical” from 9:30 to 11:30 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. General admission is $29 for this 21-plus show. There’s new relevancy for this snarky play by John Michael Manship (book) and Melissa Carubia (music and lyrics), in which three 20-somethings whose lives have been derailed by the MBTA’s incompetency discover a secret map that will enable them to overthrow the transit system’s corruption. Songs include “The Shuttle Bus Song (We Can’t Handle It),” “The People on the T” and “The Bro Song.” All aboard, with masks. Information is here.


Saturday, Nov. 5

“Baiser Eternel” (2017) by Colette Brésilla. (Image: Colette Brésilla)

Exhibition opening for artist Colette Brésilla from 4 to 6 p.m. at The Center for Arts at the Armory cafe, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free. Haitian-born painter, textile designer and sculptor Brésilla presents a collection of works created with with palette knives, oil sticks and wax paste, which adds texture to the two-dimensional. Information is here.

An Evening of Spanish Music from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Multicultural Arts Center, 41 Second St., East Cambridge. General admission is $20 (with online fees, $22.85). Performances by Tomomi Kohno and international classical guitarist, dancer and singer Zaira Meneses. Vaccinations and masks are required. Information is here.

Jean Appolon Expressions’ sixth annual Banboche celebration from 6:30 to 10 p.m. at The Center for Arts at the Armory cafe, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. General admission is $35. The dance company brings back its celebration of Haitian culture for the first time since 2019, with performances, handcrafted goods, drinks and dancing centered around Fèt Gede, the Haitian Day of the Dead. Information is here.

“Macbeth” (continuing) at 8 p.m. at Unity Somerville, 6 William St., just off College Avenue near Davis Square, Somerville. Tickets are $20 (with online fees, $22.69, continuing through Sunday and returning next week). Information is here.

Ballpit Comedy from 9:30 to 11 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. Tickets are $15. A night of stand-up dedicated to showcasing and uplifting comedians who are typically the “first, only or different” on lineups – often female, queer and people of color – this time including headliner Cher Lynn with Ameera Abu-alsaoud, Ariana Seymourian, Caroline Moore, Gabi Hajos, Emily Mame Ford and Maria Palombi. Masks are required. Information is here.


Sunday, Nov. 6

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream” from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge (and returning Nov. 8 and Nov. 12). Free, but registration is required. The Frances Addelson Shakespeare Players present this kid-friendly fantastical comedy with fairies, a love triangle and magic that turns one of the stars into a donkey. Information is here.

“Evicted” exhibit closing: “What’s Next?” at 6 p.m. at The Center for Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free, but registration is requested. Get a final look at an immersive exhibition based on Matthew Desmond’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City” – and join with the Community Action Agency of Somerville to figure out how to continue the fight for housing justice. Information is here.

“The Corners of the Moon”: Uncanny Music for Hallowmas from 6:30 to 7:45 p.m. at Saint Peter’s Episcopal Church, 15 Sellers St., Riverside near Central Square. A spooky program for the season with tunes by Campion and Johnson, Picforth and Lawes depicting ghost encounters, witches’ dances, mad songs, fantastic beasts and broadside ballads about Tom o’ Bedlam’s deranged exploits and the midnight antics of mischievous Robin Goodfellow. Information is here.

Beth Orton. (Photo: Beth Orton via Facebook)

Beth Orton performs at 8 p.m. at the Somerville Theatre’s Crystal Ballroom, 55 Davis Square. General admission is $28 for this 18-plus show. The famed British “folktronica” star of the 1990s and 2000s tours behind her new album, “Weather Alive,” which featured just her voice and a “cheap, crappy” upright piano in a shed in her garden, conjuring a deeply meditative atmosphere. Information is here.

The Boston Camerata’s “Les Miracles de Notre Dame” concert at 8 p.m. at Harvard Memorial Church, 1 Harvard Yard, Harvard Square. Admission is $28 to $66. Medieval vocal music, miracle tales, student songs and minstrel turns that would have been experienced in the shadow of Paris’ Notre Dame – and in this case is performed by Camerata; the Harvard Choral Fellows, directed by Edward Elwyn Jones; and the Longy School of Music of Bard College. With pre-concert talks by professors Thomas F. Kelly of Harvard University and Caroline Bruzelius of Duke University. Information is here.

“Macbeth” (continuing) at 8 p.m. at Unity Somerville, 6 William St., just off College Avenue near Davis Square, Somerville. Tickets are $20 (with online fees, $22.69, returning Thursday through Nov. 12). Information is here.