Saturday, July 20, 2024

Friday, Nov. 3

Responsibility and Repair: Legacies of Indigenous Enslavement, Indenture and Colonization at Harvard and Beyond” conference from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Knafel Center of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, 10 Garden St., west of Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. This conference brings together Native and university leaders to advance a national dialogue, expand research and establish and deepen partnerships with Indigenous communities, using the landmark “Report of the Presidential Committee on Harvard & the Legacy of Slavery” (2022) as a starting point. Information is here.

Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival film screenings from 6 to 8 p.m. at Kendall/MIT Open Space at 292 Main St., Kendall Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. Watch selected award-winning films about the great outdoors from around the world. Presented with the MIT Outing Club. Information is here.

DJ Afrika Islam and Ice T. (Photo: Jeff Oto)

Day One DNA: 50 Years in Hiphop Culture opening reception from 6 to 8 p.m. at The Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African & African American Art, 102 Mount Auburn St., Harvard Square. Free. Running through May, this multimedia exhibition curated by Laylah Amatullah Barrayn celebrates 50 years of hip-hop culture with more than 200 objects from the archives of icons and longtime collaborators Ice T and DJ Afrika Islam. Information is here.

Rachel Sumner performs at 7:30 p.m. at the Rooted Armory Café at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free. The new Rooted Music Series kicks off this evening (and continues Nov. 10 and Dec. 1) with a solo performance by the folk singer and 2021 John Lennon Award-winning songwriter Rachel Sumner. Information is here.

2023 Dancing America Rapper Tournament ceilidh at 7:30 p.m. at John Harvard’s Brewery & Ale House, 33 Dunster St., Harvard Square (with events continuing through Sunday). $20. Rapper sword dancing is a fast-paced form of traditional English dance involving metal blades, percussive stepping and intricate figures – nothing to do with rap music. This opening party includes ceilidh dancing, music and performances. Information is here.

MIT Chamber Chorus: “Thirsting for Hope” performance at 8 p.m at the MIT Chapel, 50 Massachusetts Ave., Area II, Cambridge. $5. This concert draws inspiration from African American spirituals, J.S. Bach and the words of Walt Whitman, exploring the progression from the inevitable unity of fear and triumph to hope. Information is here.

Amer Zahr in Boston: “The Uncivilized Truth” from 8 to 10 p.m. at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. $30 and 14-plus. As a Palestinian Arab American comedian, speaker, writer, academic and adjunct law professor in Detroit, Zahr draws on his experiences growing up as a child of Palestinian refugees to talk about politics, society, culture, identity, Palestine, Islam and more. Information is here.

The Outlet: Open Mic Night with Elae Weeks from 8 to 10 p.m. at the Multicultural Arts Center, 41 Second St., East Cambridge. $10. Showcase your skills, whether you’re a poet, artist, dancer or singer. Dorchester’s Elae Weeks curates this first event with more to come. Information is here.


Saturday, Nov. 4

Hive Safety Training from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the Fab Lab of The Hive at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free, but register. This workshop familiarizes you with The Hive makerspace and shows how to use its resources and keep safe. Completion of safety training is the entry point to using the space. Information is here.

Somerville Winter Farmers Market from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at The Center for Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free. Come on down to the first day of the 14th season of this ever-growing weekly market, which this year offers more than 70 vendors selling locally grown or raised foods and live music. Information is here.

Gardening Workshop with Green City Growers from 2 to 3:30 p.m. on the lawn of the Somerville Public Library, 79 Highland Ave., Central Hill. Free, but register. It’s the last day to join this hands-on class to learn when and what to plant and how to bring in a great harvest. Information is here.

2023 Dancing America Rapper Tournament from 2 to 5 p.m. at various spots around Harvard Square (with events continuing through Sunday). Free. Rapper sword dancing is a fast-paced form of traditional English dance involving metal blades, percussive stepping and intricate figures – nothing to do with rap music. Information is here.

Nino de los Reyes Flamenco Quartet at 3 p.m. at the Multicultural Arts Center, 41 Second St., East Cambridge (and continuing Nov. 5). Free. Nino de los Reyes was the first dancer to win a Grammy Award (for best Latin jazz album “Antidote,” collaborating with Chick Corea). The artist returns with his band for an up-close look at the details of his artistry. Sponsored by the Celebrity Series of Boston. Information is here.

Mother Fungus (via the band’s Facebook)

Anarchist Woodstock from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Cambridge Community Center, 5 Callender St., Riverside. $10 suggested donation. This benefit concert for the Boston Anarchist Book Fair (repeating Nov. 11-12) features a diverse lineup of jazz, union folk punk, shoegaze, psychedelic rock and stoner black metal from Jake and the Infernal Machine, Mother Fungus, Wet the Evil, Slow Quit and more. Information is here.

Somerville Songwriter Sessions at 7:30 p.m. at the Café at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. $15 suggested donation. An open mic starts off the evening. Eric Schwartz, Chris and Meredith Thompson and Terry Kitchen then perform a solo set each, followed by a round-robin song swap. Information is here.

“Banboche”: Celebrate 10 Years of Jean Appolon Expressions at 7:30 p.m. in the performance hall at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. $35. A Haitian-style get-together with a marketplace of handcrafted goods; dance performance; and a DJ’d party. Information is here.

“Two Roads” chorus performance at 8 p.m. at Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. $15. More than 100 student singers from The Harvard-Radcliffe Collegium Musicum, a mixed chorus, and the Radcliffe Choral Society, a treble chorus, present an evening of eclectic and poignant vocal works, including the world premiere of “The Side Road” by Grammy- and Pulitzer-winning composer Caroline Shaw. Information is here.

Thirst: A Performance of Love, Loss and Longing” dance from 8 to 9:30 p.m. at The Dance Complex, 536 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, Cambridge (and continuing Sunday). $15 to $50. Michelle Pearson’s new work commissioned by the American Dance Festival brings beauty and humanity to the pain of deep loss. Performed by local dancers and members of the Raleigh, North Carolina-based Black Box Dance Theatre. Information is here.


Sunday Nov. 5

2023 Dancing America Rapper Tournament workshops from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at John Harvard’s Brewery & Ale House, 33 Dunster St., Harvard Square (with events continuing through Sunday). $20. Rapper sword dancing is a fast-paced form of traditional English dance involving metal blades, percussive stepping and intricate figures – nothing to do with rap music. Watch the competing teams participate in master classes with a master rapper sword dancer. Then, learn how to rapper sword dance yourself. Information is here.

Jazzmyn RED. (Photo; All Rhymes)

Hip-Hop Experience Workshop: The Roots from 1 to 3 p.m. at Harvard Art Museums, Menschel Hall, 32 Quincy St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. In celebration of the 50th anniversary of hip-hop, artist and singer Jazzmyn RED discusses storytelling, sampling and the socioeconomic conditions of the birthplace of hip-hop, plus reflect on the influence early storytellers have on hip-hop culture today. Information is here.

Nino de los Reyes Flamenco Quartet (continued) at 3 p.m. at the Multicultural Arts Center, 41 Second St., East Cambridge. Free. Information is here.

Human Rights Campaign panel discussion from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Café at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free. A panel discussion and Q&A for all with leaders of LGBTQ+ organizations discussing allyship, shared challenges and the current political climate. Information is here.

Cambridge Symphony Orchestra performs Mahler and Ellington from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Kresge Auditorium, 48 Massachusetts Ave. $15 and $25. The symphony performs pieces by Gustav Mahler (Symphony No. 1 in D major) and Duke Ellington (“Black, Brown and Beige”) foreshadowing thematic undercurrents for its 49th season – namely, the choice to acknowledge the world’s beauty even amid society’s darkest moments. Information is here.

Alisa Weilerstein performs “Fragments 1” at 7 p.m. at Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. $39 to $85. The first installment of the cellist’s groundbreaking solo performance series ties together new commissions from contemporary composers with movements from Bach’s first cello suite, employing responsive lighting and scenic architecture to draw audiences into an immersive, multisensory experience so they can “access that primal connection with music.” Information is here.

Thirst: A Performance of Love, Loss and Longing” dance (continued) from 7 to 8:30 at The Dance Complex, 536 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, Cambridge. $15 to $50. Information is here.

Bantu Continua Uhuru Consciousness performs at 7:30 p.m. at Crystal Ballroom, 55 Davis Square, Somerville. $28 and $35. The hard-hitting, deep-grooving South African collective that turns Soweto Township-inspired percussion, bass and vocals into dance music filled with strong healing messages and propulsive jams. Information is here.

“Sweeney Todd, The Demon Barber of Fleet Street” at 8 p.m. at Arrow Street Arts, 2 Arrow Street, Harvard Square, Cambridge. $55 to $65. This matinee is the final performance of the monthlong run of this Sondheim classic at Arrow Street Arts in the former Oberon space. Renovations aren’t finished – no bar or concessions until 2024. Information is here.


Monday, Nov. 6

Saleem H. Ali reads from “Soil to Foil: Aluminum and the Quest for Industrial Sustainability” from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Harvard Museum of Natural History’s Haller Hall, 24 Oxford St., Baldwin neighborhood. Free, but register. The environmental scientist argues that aluminum’s seeming abundance has given rise to wasteful and destructive practices – an example of broader lessons about stewardship of nonrenewable resources. Information is here.

“Till” film screening at 6 to 8:45 p.m. at the atrium of the Somerville Public Library West Branch, 40 College Ave., near Davis Square. Free, but register. The Somerville Reads program screens the 2022 drama “Till,” which tells the story of Mamie Till-Mobley’s pursuit of justice after the murder of her son, Emmett Till. Information is here.

Lina Ghotmeh lectures on “Living in Symbiosis: An Archeology of the Future” from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Gund Hall, 42 Quincy St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The Paris-based Ghotmeh discusses her designs for the Stone Garden apartment block in Beirut, Lebanon; the Hermès Workshops in Louviers, France; and the temporary Serpentine Pavilion in London (just disassembled). Information is here.

Helena de Bres reads from “How to Be Multiple: The Philosophy of Twins” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. Pondering questions such as “What makes someone themself rather than someone else?” and “Can one person be housed in two bodies?” de Bres argues that our reactions to twins reveal desires and fears about selfhood, fate and human connection. University of Massachusetts at Lowell philosophy professor Carol Hay joins the conversation. Information is here.

Authors Gish Jen, Claire Messud, Laura Zigman and Virginia Pye discuss Cambridge from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free. The multi-award-winning novelists, short story writers and non-fiction authors (and ghost writers) talk about Cambridge as an inspiration for their work. Pye, author of the recently released novel “The Literary Undoing of Victoria Swann,” moderates. Information is here.

Vievee Francis reads from “The Shared World” from 8 to 9 p.m. at Cambridge Center for Adult Education, 56 Brattle St., Harvard Square. $5. Francis is joined in conversation about her fourth book of poems by Matthew Olzmann, whose most recent collection is “Constellation Route.” Sponsored by the Blacksmith House Poetry Series. Information is here.

Midnight release party of “Iron Flame” by Rebecca Yarros at 11 p.m. at Porter Square Books, 25 White St., Porter Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. The only Boston-area bookstore presenting a midnight release party for the anticipated follow-up to “Fourth Wing” will provide trivia, a costume contest and refreshments but highly recommends you preorder your copy so you can pick it up when the clock strikes 12. Information is here.


Tuesday, Nov. 7

Navigating Solo: Planning Tools for Aging Well from 2 to 3:30 p.m. in the lecture hall of the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge (and continuing every Tuesday through Nov. 14). Free, but register. The library foundation and nonprofit Cambridge Neighbors sponsor the fourth of five talks and Q&As on aging solo. This week’s topic: “Where You Live Matters: Exploring what the best housing options are for you,” facilitated by Ailene Gerhardt. Information is here.

Sarah Jaquette Ray discusses “A Field Guide to Climate Anxiety: How to Keep Your Cool on a Warming Planet” from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Marran Theater, 34 Mellen St., on Lesley University’s Doble Campus in the Baldwin neighborhood near Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The author draws from mindfulness studies, environmental studies, sociology and psychology to validate the anxiety, guilt and fear arising from climate change and shares coping strategies that advocate for climate justice. Information is here.

Alfie. (Photo: Carl Safina)

Carl Safina reads from “Alfie and Me: What Owls Know, What Humans Believe” at 6 p.m. at the Harvard Science Center, 1 Oxford St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free, or $34.53 with book. As the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, Safina’s rescue of a near-death baby screech owl inspired a deep dive into humanity’s relationship with nature across cultures and throughout history. During this event co-sponsored by the Harvard Book Store he’ll be joined in conversation by J. Drew Lanham, ornithologist, naturalist, writer, poet and wildlife ecology professor at Clemson University. Information is here.

Tracy K. Smith reads from “To Free the Captives: A Plea for the American Soul” at 6 p.m. The Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $32 (includes book). Smith, a Harvard professor and Pulitzer-winning poet and memoirist, examines her Alabama ancestors’ life to, in her own words, “write a book about Black strength, Black continuance and the powerful forms of belief and community that have long bolstered the soul of my people.” Author and Boston University professor Ibram X. Kendi talks with Smith in a Harvard Book Store event. Information is here.

Drag Tribute to “Nirvana Nevermind” at 8 p.m. at Crystal Ballroom, 55 Davis Square, Somerville. $19 to $35. Full Spin brings alternative rock to the drag stage with a tribute to Nirvana and the band’s legendary breakthrough album, “Nevermind.” Featuring 10 drag stars including the event host, Majenta with a J. Information is here.

Pollinator Trivia Night at 8 p.m. at Aeronaut Brewing, 14 Tyler St., near Union Square, Somerville. Free. Tufts Pollinator Initiative representatives ask pollinator-focused questions covering topics from politics to pop culture and more. Information is here.


Wednesday, Nov. 8

Preparing for the MIThenge in 2007 in MIT’s Infinite Corridor. (Photo: Frank Hebbert via Flickr)

“From Stonehenge to MIThenge: Revealing Our Place in the Universe Through Cosmic Alignments” lecture from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Building 10-250 at 222 Memorial Drive, Cambridge. Free. This coming Friday and Saturday the cosmos and MIT will align such that the setting sun shines straight down the third floor of the Infinite Corridor. Professor Richard P. Binzel examines what factors create the curious local alignment and how cosmic alignments are essential tools for understanding our place in the Universe. Information is here.

Artists Talk: What If… Why Not? from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the CAA@Canal Gallery, 650 E. Kendall St., Kendall Square, Cambridge. Free. Artists Michael Bourque, Nathan Bourque, Madeleine Lord and Derrick Te Paske talk about a gallery exhibition up through Nov. 24 featuring their works. Information is here.

Kip Thorne and Lia Halloran read from “The Warped Side of Our Universe: An Odyssey through Black Holes, Wormholes, Time Travel and Gravitational Waves” at 6 p.m. at the Harvard Science Center, 1 Oxford St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free, or $53.13 with book. Nobel-winning physicist Thorne and artist Halloran produced a playful yet deeply curious science book celebrating the beauty of our universe by using poetic verse and more than 100 otherworldly paintings to explicate objects and phenomena made from warped space and time. Sponsored by Harvard Book Store, the Harvard University Division of Science, the Harvard Library and the Harvard Center for Astrophysics. Information is here.

Crochet pumpkin workshop from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at Cambridge Public Library O’Neill Branch, 70 Rindge Ave., North Cambridge. Free, but register. Adults of all skill levels are welcome to learn the art of crocheting a charming pumpkin from the library’s friendly staff. All materials and guidance are provided, just bring your enthusiasm for crafting and enjoyment of the season. Information is here.

“Objects of Addiction” lecture on the Opium Wars from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at Harvard Art Museums, Menschel Hall, 32 Quincy St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. A panel of Harvard faculty in Chinese history, business, politics and law discusses the 19th-century Opium Wars and the legacy of the opium trade in U.S.-China relations. A related exhibit upstairs runs through Jan. 14. Information is here.

Joe Roman reads from “Eat, Poop, Die” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The conservation biologist and marine ecologist makes a case for understanding how the effects of the less glamorous forces of rotting carcasses and deposited feces are essential to local ecosystems everywhere in the world and affect the global climate cycle, arguing they provide us with opportunities to undo environmental damage. Information is here.

Brewery Book Group from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the back taproom of Lamplighter Brewing, 284 Broadway, The Port, Cambridge (and every other month). Free, but register and 21-plus. The brewery teams up with the Cambridge Public Library to highlight contemporary works from marginalized voices. This evening’s title: “A Mind Spread Out on the Ground” by Alicia Elliot. Information is here.

[Working Title] pop-up reading series from 7 to 9 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. $5 to $10. A curated live reading of the works of four queer and trans Boston-area writers followed by a open mic aimed at building community and a new literary canon. Information is here.

Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical” at 7:30 p.m. at Loeb Drama Center, 64 Brattle St., Harvard Square, Cambridge (and continuing through Nov. 11). $15. A modern rock score updates this Victorian London tale about the chilling consequences of unleashing one’s inner demons. Produced by the Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club. Information is here.

Spelling Bee(r) from 8 to 10 p.m. at Aeronaut Brewing, 14 Tyler St., near Union Square, Somerville (and continuing Dec. 6). Free and 21-plus. The brewery allows up to 10 teams of up to three members each to cross swords, orthographically speaking. Signup is first come, first served. Information is here.


Thursday, Nov. 9

Some members of Sweet Honey in the Rock. (Photo: Christopher Robinson)

Sweet Honey in the Rock public workshop at 3 p.m. at the Longy School of Music, 27 Garden St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Suggested donation of up to $20. An informal and intimate session by the Grammy-nominated African American vocal ensemble celebrating its 50th year. Information is here.

Fall by the Fireside from 3 to 7 p.m. at Harvard’s Science Center Plaza between Harvard Yard at Kirkland and Oxford streets, near Harvard Square, Cambridge (also Nov. 16 and Nov. 30). Free. Tis the season for the cozy fire pits at Harvard, with outdoor games and free hot apple cider. Information is here.

Alice McDermott reads from “Absolution” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The novelist and member of the faculty at the Sewanee Writers Conference tells a story, mostly through letters written after the fact, of two young American do-gooder wives who become friends in Saigon in 1963, and how in hindsight their actions to “help” the people of Vietnam may have been more selfish than selfless. Joining in conversation is Laura Zigman, author of “Small World.” Information is here.

Poet Alan Shapiro reads from 7 to 8 p.m. at Grolier Poetry Book Shop on 6 Plympton St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $10 and register. With an introduction by Katherine Hollander. Information is here.

Palaver Strings Beehive Chamber Series: “Homeland” from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Multicultural Arts Center, 41 Second St., East Cambridge. $30. This program by the musician-led string ensemble based in Portland, Maine, explores folk-inspired music by a diverse group of composers paying homage to their homelands: Carlos Guastavino (Argentina), Violetta Parra (Chile), Leos Janacek (Czech Republic) and Bela Bartok (Hungary). The evening concludes with Brahms’ Trio in A Minor, which he composed after visiting his friend clarinetist Richard Muhlfeld in Meiningen, Germany. Information is here.

Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical (continued) at 7:30 p.m. at Loeb Drama Center, 64 Brattle St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $15. Information is here.

The Jar presents “Sugar Daddy” with Sam Morrison from 7:30 to 10 p.m. at The Foundry, 101 Rogers St., East Cambridge. $60 for a jar of six tickets, and 21-plus. Brooklyn comedian Sam Morrison debuted his solo show at Manhattan’s SoHo Playhouse and visits here for just one night after performing it around the U.K. The “convener model” of Boston-based nonprofit The Jar means you buy six tickets: two for you and your “plus one”; two people you normally go to events with; and two people out of your circle and different from you in some way but whom, you’d like to know better. Come at 7 p.m. for the open bar and stay for dialogue and dessert after the performance. Information is here.

Kotoko Brass performs at 8 p.m. at Crystal Ballroom, 55 Davis Square, Somerville. $25 and $28. Syncopated African percussion polyrhythms team up with hard-hitting grooves from New Orleans- and West African-inspired horns (plus guitar, keys and bass) in joyful, improvisational dance music. Information is here.


Friday, Nov. 10

Autumn Hollow (via the band’s Facebook)

Autumn Hollow performs at 7:30 p.m. in the performance hall at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free. The second installment of the Rooted Music Series, which continues Dec. 1, features a band that music magazine “The Big Takeover” describes as “triangulated somewhere between Bruce Springsteen’s bedroom records and Fleet Foxes’ rootsy rock and roll.” Converse Outlet opens. Information is here.

Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical (continued) at 7:30 p.m. at Loeb Drama Center, 64 Brattle St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $15. Information is here.

“Web of Murder” performance at 8 p.m. at Theatre@First, Unity Somerville, 6 William St., Somerville (and continuing most days through Nov. 18). $20 and $25. Agatha Christie meets “Arsenic & Old Lace” in this murder mystery play by Jonathan Troy. When the cruel Minerva Osterman invites her nieces to her remote, crumbling mansion for the weekend, who will survive? Information is here.

The Cambridge Jazz Foundation presents “Divas Live!” at 8 p.m. at the Multicultural Arts Center, 41 Second St., East Cambridge. $35. Come early for the reception with cash bar, then be immersed into the music of Thelonious Monk, Nina Simone and Roberta Flack performed by top Boston vocalists Dominique Eade, Grammy-nominated Farayi Malek and Gabrielle Goodman. The Ron Savage Trio accompanies. Information is here.