Friday, July 19, 2024

Friday, Oct. 27

Inmanween 2023 from 3 to 9 p.m. all along Inman Square. Free. Visit the newly improved square with its renovated pedestrian crossings, separated bike lanes and eye-catching public art while trick-or-treating at shops after 3 p.m, making Halloween crafts at Vellucci Plaza at 4 p.m. and watching a spooky movie at 6:30 p.m. Beer garden, too, of course. Information is here.

Meet “Chef’s Kiss” author Jarrett Melendez from 6 to 7 p.m. at The Lab @ Curio Spice, 2267 Massachusetts Ave., North Cambridge. $5, or $25 with book. Somerville-based food writer and former line cook Melendez answers questions from Milk Street TV instructor Josh Mamaclay about his charming and upbeat queer-romance graphic novel. This first author event for Curio’s new Sensory Storytellers series includes spiced refreshments. Information is here.

GlobeDocs Film Festival at 6:30 and 9 p.m. at The Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle St., Harvard Square, Cambridge (and continuing through Sunday). $15 per film. Screenings of documentaries followed by engaging conversations with Boston Globe journalists and filmmakers. This evening: “Sorry/Not Sorry” about comedian Louis C.K. and “The Stones and Brian Jones.” Information is here.

SJ Sindu reads from “The Goth House Experiment” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The author of “Blue-Skinned Gods” discusses her short story collection, which features an array of loners and artists – a young poet haunted by the ghost of Oscar Wilde, a home brewer and wife during lockdown, a boy with wings – who struggle for connection and fulfillment in a world battered by the pandemic and reactionary politics. Information is here.

Illuminated Block Party from 7 to 10 p.m. on JFK Street between Mount and Brattle streets, Harvard Square, Cambridge (and continuing Saturday). Free. Two days of beer gardens, food and music featuring an interactive art installation by Pneuhaus that invites visitors to pedal bike-driven generators to power a neon-colored grove of inflatables that change color and contours in time with their momentum. An outdoor movie plays on nearby Palmer Street at 7 p.m., too. Information is here.

Cirque of the Dead at the A.R.T. in 2019. (Photo: Charles Jones)

Cirque of the Dead at 8 p.m. at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville (and continuing twice on Saturday, Oct. 28, and once on Tuesday, Oct. 31). $38 and 18-plus. Boston Circus Guild’s show blends aerials, acrobatics, contortion and more with creepy camp and humorous horror; this year’s story involves ghost hunters exploring Somerville’s most haunted historic landmark, with action happening on all sides and in every spot in the theater. Information is here.

The Rocky Horror Show” at 8 p.m. at Central Square Theater, 450 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, Cambridge (and continuing through Nov. 26). $24 to $83. This weekend begins the monthlong run of the original musical by Richard O’Brien that launched the cult movie. Co-directors Jo Michael Rezes and Lee Mikeska Gardner give it a fresh take and infuse it with sci-fi fun. Information is here.

“Sweeney Todd, The Demon Barber of Fleet Street” at 8 p.m. at Arrow Street Arts, 2 Arrow Street, Harvard Square, Cambridge (and continuing through Nov. 5). $55 to $65. Catch this Sondheim classic before it leaves the new Arrow Street Arts in the former Oberon space. Renovations aren’t finished – no bar or concessions until 2024. Information is here.

Lamplighter Sessions at 8 p.m. at Club Passim, 47 Palmer St., Harvard Square, Cambridge (and continuing through Tuesday). $28. Presented by the singer-songwriter-iconoclast Peter Mulvey, this multinight mini festival of improvisational art – music, spoken word, visual art and theater – always includes Hallowe’en. Some years have featured “Luthier expositions, a reading of Eugene Ionesco’s ‘Rhinoceros,’ in-the-round swaps between stars and fledglings, tributes to Greg Brown and Los Lobos, string-music extravaganzas, costume parties and one consistent event: some permutation of musicians performs Tom Waits’ classic record ‘Rain Dogs.’” Information is here.

Calling All Zombies Halloween Dance from 8 to 11:45 p.m. at Q Ballroom, 26 New St., Suite 3, Fresh Pond, Cambridge. $16 to $24. Come in costume, if you’d like, to this annual event by Boston Swing Central and dance to music from The River Street Six (which may sound like “The River Styx” to an addlebrained zombie.) No partner required; no street shoes. Information is here.


Saturday, Oct. 28

Contributing Poets read from “This Land, My Beloved” from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free. Contemporary Haitian poets take the stage to read their work from an anthology edited by the prolific multilingual poet and editor Tontongi, author of 2021’s “Tyaka Poetica,” published by Cambridge-based Trilingual Press. Information is here.

Nature in the City Festival from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Mass Audubon Nature Center at Magazine Beach, 668 Memorial Drive, Cambridgeport. Free. Connect with community while you explore nature, make art, dance to live music, eat and play games as the sun sets over the Charles River. Information is here.

Brisket from Pigpen’s BBQ. (Photo: Pigpen’s BBQ via Facebook)

Rib Fest Round II from 2 to 9 p.m. at Remnant Brewing Satellite, 877 Cambridge St., Wellington-Harrington, Cambridge. Free. Remnant Satellite brings in ribs by Pigpen’s BBQ, which won the brewery top prize at the “Smoke This” Rib Fest on Oct. 1, and hosts music from Sam Reid and the Riotact from 7 to 9 p.m. Information is here.

Roxane Gay reads from “Opinions: A Decade of Arguments, Criticism and Minding Other People’s Business!” at 3 p.m. at Cambridge Rindge and Latin School’s Fitzgerald Auditorium, 459 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. $40 with book. The bestselling author brings her wise voice and sharp insights to this collection of nonfiction essays culled from her past decade’s writings for a range of publications. Topics include politics, feminism, the culture wars and civil rights. Information is here.

Tufts Street Halloween Block Party from 3 to 9 p.m. on Tufts Street in Cambridgeport, (rain date: Oct. 29). Free. Activities such as pumpkin art, hunts, races and video game tournaments start at 3 p.m.; a slow cooker potluck begins at 5:30 p.m.; and Halloween-themed family films start at 6 p.m. Bring a dish to share and your own plates, bowls, utensils and blanket or chairs for dining. Costumes encouraged.

Fall Fest from 4 to 7 p.m. at Kendall/MIT Open Space at 292 Main St., Kendall Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. Music from Fly By Brass Band and Annie and the Fur Trappers, food trucks, treats and 21-plus drinks for purchase, free hot cocoa and hot apple cider, plus kids activities and, when it’s dark, stargazing with the MIT Astrogazers. Information is here.

Cirque of the Dead from 6 to 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 to 11 p.m. at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville (and continuing Tuesday). $38 and 18-plus. Boston Circus Guild’s show blends aerials, acrobatics and contortion with creepy camp and humorous horror. Information is here.

Analog By Choice presents “G is for Grant Still and Grieg” at 7 p.m. at The Dance Complex, 536 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, Cambridge. Free, but donations suggested. Experts in movement and dance perform alongside a Boston collective of chamber musicians who feature historically underrepresented composers alongside better-known contemporaries – paired by the letters that start their names. Information is here.

Cafe Raqs from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Cafe at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. $10 suggested donation. A legion of regional belly dancers performs, including longtimers and up-and-coming stars. Information is here.

Illuminated Block Party (continued) from 7 to 10 p.m. on JFK Street between Mount and Brattle streets, Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. Information is here.

Second Annual Worlds Collide Showcase from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at The Foundry, 101 Rogers St., East Cambridge. $15. A concert and competition brings together emerging musicians across all genres to create compositions with proceeds going toward charities of their choice. Presented by The Pandora Consort, a new early music ensemble that promotes innovative, interactive reimagining of classical music performance. Information is here.

Halloween Bonanza from 7:30 to 11 p.m. at Aeronaut Brewing, 14 Tyler St., near Union Square, Somerville. Free and 21-plus. Features specialty beers, tunes from DJ Donuts, hourly costume contests and creepy classics streaming all night, including “Little Shop of Horrors” and “House on Haunted Hill.” Information is here.

Lamplighter Sessions (continued) at 8 p.m. at Club Passim, 47 Palmer St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $28. Information is here.

MIT Ensembles perform “Global Soundscapes: Celebrating the Universality of Music” from 8 to 10 p.m. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Kresge Auditorium, 48 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge. Free, but register. Under music director Frederick Harris Jr., the MIT Wind Ensemble performs Prokofiev, Clifton Williams, Ira Hearshen and Sousa, and the MIT Festival Jazz Ensemble performs Ellington, Miguel Zenón, Kurt Rosenwinkel and others. Information is here.

Candlelight: A Haunted Evening of Halloween Classics concert at 8:45 p.m. at First Church in Cambridge, 11 Garden St., Harvard Square. $40 and 8-plus. The Beacon Street String Quartet, illuminated by glowing candles, plays selections from a wide range of creepy-context music, from the themes of “The Exorcist” and “Stranger Things” to eerie/scary classical pieces from Schubert and Shostakovich. Information is here.


Sunday, Oct. 29

Harvard Square Open Market from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., on Church Street, Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. It’s the final day (until June) for this weekly outdoor arts and market where you can find unique items to treasure. Information is here.

Laura Meckler reads from “Dream Town: Shaker Heights and the Quest for Racial Equity” at 3 p.m. at Porter Square Books, 25 White St., Porter Square, Cambridge. Free. The award-winning journalist explores why a racial academic achievement gap persists in Shaker Heights after its groundbreaking work integrating housing in the 1950s and schools in the 1970s. Joining in conversation is Suevon Lee of WBUR. Information is here.

Early Music Afternoons with Duo Maresienne from 3 to 4 p.m. at Somerville Museum, 1 Westwood Road, in the Spring Hill neighborhood. $25. Duo Maresienne (Olav Chris Henriksen, baroque lute; Carol Lewis, viola da gamba) perform the first of five Sunday afternoon concerts through May with guests. Today, Aldo Abreu (recorder) joins to perform masterpieces of the German Baroque such as sonatas, concertos, fantasies, partitas and suites by Weiss, Baron, Telemann and Bach. Information is here.

Fabiola Mendez (via the artist‘s website)

Fabiola Méndez performs from 5 to 8 p.m. at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. $20 to $22. A night with Méndez singing and playing the Puerto Rican cuatro, a five-double string traditional guitar, and opening at 6 p.m. with a viewing of Méndez’ first documentary, “Negrura: What Does it Mean to Be Afro-Latinx?” (2022). Information is here.

Lamplighter Sessions (continued) at 7 p.m. at Club Passim, 47 Palmer St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $28. Information is here.

My Life with the Thrill Kill Kult “Evil Eye Tour 87–97” at 8 p.m. at Somerville Theatre’s Crystal Ballroom, 55 Davis Square. $35. TKK performs jams from the classic albums “Confessions of a Knife,” “I See Good Spirits,” “Sexplosion,” “13 Above The Night” and “Hit & Run Holiday.” Guests include Detroit’s avant-garde electronic duo Adult and underground pop purveyor Kanga. Information is here.


Monday, Oct. 30

Somerville Flea Halloween Market from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Holland Street and Buena Vista Road, Davis Square, Somerville. Free. Have “spookified” fun while shopping from vendors dressed in costume who have candy and good times on hand. Information is here.

Hilary Holbrow speaks on “Tainted Leave: Flexible Workplace Policies and Gender Inequality in Japan” from noon to 1 p.m. at the Center for Government and International Studies, Knafel Building (Room K262), 1737 Cambridge St., Mid-Cambridge. Free. The Indiana University educator discusses her research into persistent gender inequality in Japan’s white-collar workplaces with Harvard’s Mary C. Brinton. Information is here.

Arthropod Surveys at Fresh Pond from 2 to 3 p.m. meeting on site at the Lusitania Meadow at 615 Concord Ave. in West Cambridge at Fresh Pond, Cambridge. Free. Join scientists from Earthwise Aware to help observe and collect information about what insects and arachnids visit the reservation’s meadows, compiling the findings into global databases. Information is here.

Navigating Solo: Planning Tools for Aging Well from 2 to 3:30 p.m. in the lecture hall of the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge (and continuing every Tuesday through Nov. 14). Free, but register. The library foundation and nonprofit Cambridge Neighbors sponsor the third of five talks and Q&As on aging solo. This week’s topic: “Evaluating, assessing and enhancing your support system,” facilitated by Ailene Gerhardt. Information is here.

Bisi Xotyeni. (Photo: Callie Chapman via Facebook)

African Dance Workout with Bisi from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at The Foundry, 101 Rogers St., East Cambridge (and continuing every Monday through Nov. 20). $12 to $20. Bisi Xotyeni from Jean Appolon Expressions Artists guides the class through a cardio warm-up with African dance movements, a series of strength-building exercises and a combination for everyone to dance together. All experience levels are welcome. Information is here.

McKay Coppins reads from “Romney: A Reckoning” at 6 p.m. in the lecture hall at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free, or $34.53 with book. The award-winning Atlantic staff writer discusses his in-depth portrait of Mitt Romney. Journalist Jane Clayson joins an event co-sponsored with Harvard Book Store. Information is here.

Zentangle Meet-Up from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Somerville Public Library, 79 Highland Ave., Central Hill (and continuing the last Monday of each month). Free. Be social or work quietly in this group setting as you enjoy Zentangle, a meditative drawing technique developed in Massachusetts by a former monk and a botanical illustrator couple. Easily create beautiful images by mindfully drawing structured patterns that are non-representational and unplanned, allowing you to focus on each stroke and not worry about the result. Information is here.

MIT Tango Club from 6:45 to 8 p.m. (beginner) and 7:45 to 9 p.m. (intermediate) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Building 36, Room 112, 50 Vassar St., Area II, Cambridge (and every Monday through Dec. 11). $25. Argentine tango classes with outstanding instructors. No partner required, but wear comfortable clothes and shoes with leather or suede soles, which allow you to pivot and walk backward. Information is here.

Lamplighter Sessions (continued) at 7 p.m. at Club Passim, 47 Palmer St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $28. Information is here.

YA (for Adult Readers) Book Club at 7 p.m. at Porter Square Books, 25 White St., Porter Square, Cambridge (and continuing monthly). Free, but register. This month’s selection is “The Memory Eater” by Rebecca Mahoney. Information is here.

Gone Gone Beyond performs at 8 p.m. at The Sinclair, 52 Church St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $20 and all ages. This four-member band combines electronica, jazz, soul and world music with the traditions of folk-americana songwriting. Also playing: Laura Elliot. Information is here.

Poets Suzanne Buffam and Valerie Duff read from 8 to 9 p.m. at Cambridge Center for Adult Education, 56 Brattle St., Harvard Square. $5. Sponsored by the Blacksmith House Poetry Series, which brings established and emerging writers of poetry and fiction to Harvard Square. Information is here.


Tuesday, Oct. 31

John K. Bullard reads from “Hometown” from 12:30 to 2 p.m. at MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning (Room 9-255), 105 Massachusetts Ave., Area II, Cambridge. Free. Bullard’s memoir of New Bedford chronicles his family legacy and explores the meaning of public service, responsibility and the ties that bind people to their hometowns. Information is here.

Skele-Bration! at 6 p.m. at the Café at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free, but register and 17-plus. The cafe will “be creeping it real” by showing the original “Halloween” movie and offering games, delights and haunting frights – and a (no surprise) costume contest. Information is here.

Men Without Work Halloween ’80s Party at 7 p.m. at The Burren, 247 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. Free. Set your musical expectations low and your fun expectations high for this group of friends who come together every couple of years to play some ’80s tunes badly(!). Era-appropriate costumes are requested at a celebration that began as a joint birthday party but is now subtitled “They Only Practiced Once, But It Changed Their Lives Forever.” Information is here.

Great Books Book Group from 7:15 to 9 p.m. in the Curious George Room of the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free. This week’s title: “Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius” by Jorge Luis Borges. Information is here.

Halloween Horror: An Aerial Cabaret at 7:30 p.m. at Sonia, 10 Brookline St., Central Square, Cambridge. $35 to $45 and 21-plus. Nista Heart Studio travels the poles (and holds a costume contest). Information is here.

Poetry Brothel Boston. (Photo: Poetry Brothel Boston via EventBrite)

The Poetry Brothel Boston Presents “Haunted Hearts” from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. at Bow Market Upstairs, 1 Bow Market Way, Union Square, Somerville. $40 to $75 and 21-plus. A diverse group guided by “Madame” Betty Boom reveal their alter-egos as poetry whores, tarot and palm readers and burlesque artists, often “erupting into verse and luring guests into back rooms for private readings,” as one New Yorker reporter described it. Information is here.

Skalloween! from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. $15 and 21-plus. Once Somerville presents The New Limits as The Pie Tasters; Sorry, Ma! as The Clash; Pink Slip as No Doubt; and Battlemode as Gorillaz. Information is here.

Lamplighter Sessions (continued) at 8 p.m. at Club Passim, 47 Palmer St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $28. Information is here.


Wednesday, Nov. 1

Rachel S. Geller reads from “Saving the World, One Cat at a Time” at 6 p.m. at The Harvard Coop, 1400 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. A Q&A with a cat behaviorist. Information is here.

Curator tour of “Only sounds that tremble through us” from 6 to 7 p.m. at MIT List Visual Arts Center, 20 Ames St., Kendall Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. Curator Natalie Bell leads a walk-through of the joint exhibit of artists Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme, which runs through March 3. The multichannel sound and video installation includes a collaborative work involving video fragments of communal song and dance in Iraq, Palestine, Syria and Yemen. Information is here.

Queer Knitting from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Lamplighter Brewing, 284 Broadway, The Port, Cambridge. Free. Buy a freshly brewed beer and mingle with some fellow queer folks while you knit, crochet, weave or embroider. Information is here.

Angela D. Brooks. (Photo: Harvard Graduate School of Design)

Angela D. Brooks lectures on “No Place Like Home” from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Piper Auditorium of Gund Hall, 42 Quincy St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The expert in creating viable affordable housing comes to a city hungry for insight. Information is here.

Luke Messac reads from “Your Money or Your Life: Debt Collection in American Medicine” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The emergency physician and Harvard Medical School instructor weaves patient stories into a history of law, finance and medicine to show how Americans today face lawsuits, wage garnishment, home foreclosure and even jail time over medical debt, destroying the foundational trust between doctors and patients. Joining the conversation is Salmaan Keshavjee, professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Information is here.

Caster Semenya reads from “The Race to Be Myself” at 7 p.m. at First Parish Cambridge Unitarian Universalist, 3 Church St./1446 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $15, or $38 with book. During this Harvard Book Store event, the two-time Olympic Games gold medalist discusses her new memoir, which Trevor Noah (“The Daily Show”) says “isn’t just a tale of perseverance and poise, it’s a story that makes us all interrogate our humanity and the world we build with our actions every day.” With author Kim McLarin of Emerson College. Information is here.

Catalyst Conversations presents “Beyond Reach: On Understanding in Physics” from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Bartos Theatre, 20 Ames St., Building E-15, atrium level, Kendall Square, Cambridge. Free. Kaća Bradonjić (physicist and visual artist), Tracy Slatyer (theoretical physicist) and David Kaiser (physicist and historian of science) reflect on collaborative work and the role of subjective experience in science. Information is here.

Practical Philosophy with Acropolis Boston from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the community room of the Somerville Public Library West Branch, 40 College Ave., near Davis Square. Free. Gain a fresh perspective on life with this lecture class on philosophy throughout history, which includes time for questions in a workshop-style approach. Information is here.

The Killing Devils from 7 to 10 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. $20 to $25 and 21-plus. This four-member progressive rock band stops in on its “Kicking Ass with a Smile Tour.” Information is here.

Gil Aharon Trio performs from 8:15 to 10 p.m. at Lilypad, 1353 Cambridge St., Inman Square, Cambridge (and every Wednesday). $10. A wildly eclectic mix of influences inspires composer and pianist Aharon, founder of the Lilypad performance and event space. The trio includes bassist Jef Charland, guitarist Andrew Stern and drummer Randy Wooten. Information is here.


Thursday, Nov. 2

Lesley Leadership Series with Carolyn Jeppsen from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Lesley University’s second-floor amphitheater at University Hall, 1815 Massachusetts Ave., Porter Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. The co-founder and chief executive of BroadFutures on empowering young neurodivergent people through training, mentoring and internships. Information is here.

The Mummies of Aswan: The Missing Link from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Geological Lecture Hall, Harvard Geological Museum, 24 Oxford St., in the Baldwin neighborhood near Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. Egyptologist Patrizia Piacentini from the University of Milan shares the first results of a research team that discovered 400 tombs on the West Bank at Aswan, Egypt. Information is here.

Cookbook book group from 6 to 7 p.m. at Cambridge Public Library Collins Branch, 64 Aberdeen Ave., West Cambridge. Free, but register. November’s cookbook: “Smitten Kitchen Keepers: New Classics for Your Forever Files.” Try a recipe and bring your results to this potluck, or just bring your thoughts to share and discuss with other cooks. All experience levels are welcome, and no need to bring a dish to join. Information is here.

Astrid Reischwitz talks about “Spin Club Stories” from 6:15 to 8:15 p.m. at the CAA@Canal Gallery, 650 E. Kendall St., Kendall Square, Cambridge. $15, or $69 with book. Cambridge Art Association member Reischwitz discusses her book of lens-based art influenced by her upbringing in a small farming village in Northern Germany and inspired by the old tradition of spin clubs, where village women shared stories as they met to spin wool. Information is here.

R.W.W. Greene reads from “Earth Retrograde” at 6:30 p.m. at Pandemonium Books & Games, 4 Pleasant St., Central Square, Cambridge. $18.99 with book. New Hampshire-based Greene discusses his latest novel, set eight years after the events of his 2022 novel “Mercury Rising.” Information is here.

Paola Cecchi-Dimeglio reads from “Diversity Dividend” from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in The Nexus community space on the first floor of the Hayden Library Building at 160 Memorial Drive at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. Free, but register. What works for organizations looking to accelerate their diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts and reap financial benefits. Information is here.

The ABCs of Racism: Fostering Conversations and Action about Race and Justice with Kids from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Somerville Public Library, 79 Highland Ave., Central Hill. Free, but register. This workshop explores concepts of systemic racism, the barriers that block us from engaging with kids around race and racism, the social science of race awareness in children and strategies to start and sustain antiracist action in school and at home. Sponsored by Wee the People. Information is here.

Dallas Goldtooth at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North and South Dakota in November 2016. (Photo: Rob Wilson via Flickr)

Responsibility and Repair: Legacies of Indigenous Enslavement, Indenture and Colonization at Harvard and Beyond” opening event at 7:30 p.m. at the Knafel Center of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, 10 Garden St., west of Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. The keynote to kick off Friday’s conference features Dallas Goldtooth (Mdewakanton Dakota and Dińe), an activist, actor (“Reservation Dogs,” “Rutherford Falls”), organizer, writer and Dakota culture and language teacher. Information is here.


Friday, Nov. 3

Responsibility and Repair: Legacies of Indigenous Enslavement, Indenture and Colonization at Harvard and Beyond” conference from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Knafel Center of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, 10 Garden St., west of Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. This conference brings together Native and university leaders to advance a national dialogue, expand research and establish and deepen partnerships with Indigenous communities, using the landmark “Report of the Presidential Committee on Harvard & the Legacy of Slavery” (2022) as a starting point. Information is here.

Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival film screenings from 6 to 8 p.m. at Kendall/MIT Open Space at 292 Main St., Kendall Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. Watch selected award-winning films about the great outdoors from around the world. Presented with the MIT Outing Club. Information is here.

DJ Afrika Islam and Ice T. (Photo: Jeff Oto)

Day One DNA: 50 Years in Hiphop Culture opening reception from 6 to 8 p.m. at The Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African & African American Art, 102 Mount Auburn St., Harvard Square. Free. Running through May, this multimedia exhibition curated by Laylah Amatullah Barrayn celebrates 50 years of hip-hop culture with more than 200 objects from the archives of icons and longtime collaborators Ice T and DJ Afrika Islam. Information is here.

MIT Chamber Chorus: “Thirsting for Hope” performance at 8 p.m at the MIT Chapel, 50 Massachusetts Ave., Area II, Cambridge. $5. This concert draws inspiration from African American spirituals, J.S. Bach and the words of Walt Whitman, exploring the progression from the inevitable unity of fear and triumph to hope. Information is here.

Amer Zahr in Boston: “The Uncivilized Truth” from 8 to 10 p.m. at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. $30 and 14-plus. As a Palestinian Arab American comedian, speaker, writer, academic and adjunct law professor in Detroit, Zahr draws on his experiences growing up as a child of Palestinian refugees to talk about politics, society, culture, identity, Palestine, Islam and more. Information is here.