Wednesday, July 17, 2024

Thursday, April 4

Next in Science series: James Webb Space Telescope from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Knafel Center of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, 10 Garden St., west of Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. A discussion on the exciting early results in understanding the universe and importance of engaging the public with astronomy. Four speakers include researchers and professors from Germany; Austin, Texas; and Boulder, Colorado; plus a Science News astronomy writer. Harvard astronomy professor Edo Berger moderates. Information is here.

Cicely Carew (via Lesley University)

Lesley Leadership Series with artist Cicely Carew from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Lesley University’s University Hall, 1815 Massachusetts Ave., Porter Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. This Lesley MFA grad and arts educator created an ethereal but almost three-ton sculpture for the Prudential Center (“Ambrosia”) and chromatic installations in Peloton’s New York storefront windows. She was one of six Boston artists chosen to interpret the word tzedek, Hebrew for justice, as part of the “Be the Change” public arts exhibit in Boston’s Fenway neighborhood. Information is here.

Writers Speak: Nigerian novelist Chigozie Obioma in conversation at 6 p.m. in the Fong Auditorium of Boylston Hall, Harvard Yard, Cambridge. Free. Obioma’s novels have been shortlisted for The Booker Prize, and his “The Road to the Country” will be published in June. An associate professor at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, he’s also the program director of the Oxbelly writers retreat. Harvard’s Maya Jasanoff, author of “The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World,” joins in conversation during this Mahindra Center event. Information is here.

S. Fey reads from “decompose” from 6 to 7 p.m. at The Harvard Coop, 1400 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The Los Angeles–based trans writer’s debut poetry collection explores pruning our past to make room for future growth, the expanse we are offered through the crush of heartbreak, discovering family beyond our original home and finding new meaning in our own name. Harvard professor Morgan Ridgway joins in conversation. Information is here.

Actor-artist Paulina Alexis in conversation from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at Harvard Art Museums, Menschel Hall, 32 Quincy St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The fourth annual lecture of the Harvard University Native American Program features Paulina Alexis, who played Willie Jack in the TV series “Reservation Dogs” and is a member of the Stoney tribe of the Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation. Information is here.

Intro to Upcycling from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Cambridge Public Library Central Square Branch, 45 Pearl St. Free, but register. Ninawa Zero Waste Clothes shows you have to make a fashion statement and be environmentally conscious too, by upcycling your clothing into something new. Bring a cotton shirt you no longer wear (and don’t mind tearing up). Information is here.

Hana Miletić discusses her “Soft Services” exhibition from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Bartos Theater, 20 Ames St., Building E-15, atrium level, Kendall Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. The artist describes the role photography plays in the creation of her textile works in conversation with Providence College professor E.C. Feiss. Information is here.

Bubbles & Bites: Second Annual Celebration of Youth Arts from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at 650 E. Kendall St., Kendall Square, Cambridge. $65. Fundraiser for the Community Art Center celebrates youth arts and honors Cambridge’s Janet Moses, NBC10 Boston anchor Latoyia Edwards, Central Square BID’s Michael Monestime and youth change makers Naejaleihs Pierre and Rachab Yewendwossen. Features live music and a “Taste of the Port” with local bites from neighborhood chefs. Information is here.

Rebecca Mahoney reads from “The Memory Eater” and James Kennedy reads from “Bride of the Tornado” at 7 p.m. at Porter Square Books, 25 White St., Porter Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. The YA authors are in Boston hosting the April 6 screening of the “90-Second Newbery Film Festival” of kid filmmakers who create weird short movies that tell the entire stories of Newbery-winning books in about 90 seconds. Information is here.

The Rockwell is Not a Joke Fest with Jacob Williams at 7 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. $20 to $25 and all ages. Six nights of comedy. Tonight, New York City comedian Jacob Williams makes insightful, rapid-fire jokes on personal struggles such as making friends, dating, family drama and the various hilarious pitfalls of following one’s dreams. Information is here.

Michael Ponsor reads from “Point of Order” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The senior U.S. District judge and author of “The Hanging Judge” and “The One-Eyed Judge” discusses his third novel featuring a gripping mystery set in the real-life world of a federal court. Information is here.

Bow Market Comedy Festival with Drew Dunn/LGBTQA shows at 7 and 9 p.m. at Upstairs at Bow, 1 Bow Market Way, Union Square, Somerville. $20. Four nights of comedy, each with a different lineup of local comedians, plus drinks; Howling Wolf Productions created this inaugural event. Tonight: Drew Dunn and Friends (7 p.m.) and The LGBTQA Show (9 p.m.) Information is here.

“Beyond Words” at 7:30 p.m. at Central Square Theater, Cambridge, 450 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, Cambridge (and continuing through Apr. 14). $24 to $78. Inspired by the life story of Harvard researcher Irene Pepperberg, who taught her African Grey parrot Alex to meaningfully communicate and solve problems at the level of a five-year-old child, playwright Laura Maria Censabella tracks the 30-year research experiment turned love story in this offbeat new play. This performance is followed (at 9:45 p.m.) by a discussion with Dr. Diana Reiss and Dr. Aniruddh Patel about marine animal cognition and the evolutionary foundations of musicality in animals. Information is here. 

“Spring Awakening” musical at 7:30 p.m. at Loeb Drama Center, 64 Brattle St., Harvard Square, Cambridge (and continuing through Apr. 6). $10 to $15. Themes of sexual awakening, youth revolt and self-discovery got this German play banned in 1891. Steven Sater adapted it for Broadway with Duncan Sheik’s rock score in 2006, and it won eight Tony awards. It was revived on Broadway in 2015. A film reuniting the show’s cast 15 years later played on HBO in 2022. Now it’s spring 2024, and the Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club re-awakens it. Information is here.

Born to Die: A Tribute to Lana del Rey at 7:30 p.m. in the Charles Hayden Planetarium at the Museum of Science, 1 Science Park, Boston, on the Cambridge border. $25 and 18-plus. Niki Luparelli’s tributes often sell out (she’s done them for Bowie, Blondie and Pink Floyd, among others). This time she’ll be backed by an 11-piece orchestra, including a string quartet and harp. Cash bar and light bites before the show. Information is here.

La Tragédie de Carmen at 7:30 p.m. at Arrow Street Arts, 2 Arrow Street, Harvard Square, Cambridge (and continuing April 6 and 7). $20 to $50. The Boston Opera Collaborative presents this Peter Brook adaptation of Bizet’s classic “Carmen” featuring a 15-piece chamber orchestra led by new music director Ken Yanagisawa. Information is here.

Atomic Comedy Indie Night from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the café at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free, but register. An independently produced monthly improv show featuring new and veteran local talent. Information is here.

Pianist Cooper-Moore and drummer Francisco Mela present “Music Frees Our Souls” from 7:30 to 10 p.m. at Lilypad, 1353 Cambridge St., Inman Square, Cambridge. $15 to $18. An exquisite free-jazz duet between “a great, overlooked pianist” from New York and “Boston’s most in-demand jazz drummer.” Information is here.

Reverend Kristin Michael Hayter performs at 8 p.m. at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. $25 to $30. The avant-garde singer and pianist, formerly known as Lingua Ignota, released the concept album “Saved!” in 2023 exploring a fictionalized conversion to Pentecostalism. Information is here.

Arin Ray performs at 8 p.m. at Somerville Theatre’s Crystal Ballroom, 55 Davis Square. $20 to $35. The Cincinnati-born R&B musician on his “Phases” tour has written songs for Chris Brown, John Legend and Rick Ross. Information is here.

Candlelight: Pink Floyd concert at 9 p.m. at First Church in Cambridge, 11 Garden St., Harvard Square. $33 to $59 and 8-plus. The Rasa String Quartet, illuminated by glowing candles, plays a dozen classics from the English rock band. Information is here.


Friday, April 5

2024 Tufts Food Systems Symposium: “Learning from Food Waste” from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Breed Memorial Hall at Tufts University, 51 Winthrop St., Medford. Free, but register. Campus and community partners and members take a fresh look at a familiar problem, connecting “downstream” effects with “upstream” causes so real change can be made. Information is here.

Movement, Rhythm and Voice from noon to 1 p.m. at The Foundry, 101 Rogers St., East Cambridge (also May 3 and June 7). Free to $15. Sophie Leurent shows how to dance joyfully and expressively to live drumming while connecting mind, body and spirit with easy movements and repetitions inspired by Haitian choreographer Herns Duplan and 20th-century American choreographer-anthropologist Katherine Dunham. Information is here.

The Harvard Jazz Combo (via Cambridge Arts)

Harvard Jazz Combo performs from noon to 1:30 p.m. at Jill Brown-Rhone Park, near Central Square, Cambridge (rain date April 12). Free. Saxophonist Don Braden directs flutist Mai Nguyen, drummer Jack Meyer, pianist Hyuntae Choi, pianist Will Kissinger, violinist Noah Kassis, vocalist Carolyn Hao and bassist Leo Weisskoff. Information is here.

12th Annual Roma Conference: “Confronting State Violence Across the Globe” from 1 to 6:30 p.m. at Harvard University’s Barker Center, 12 Quincy St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. Presentations from speakers, some Roma or of Romani descent, on state-sponsored violence against racialized communities and pathways for reform. Information is here.

“Q” documentary screening and director Q&A from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free. The 2023 Tribeca Film Festival award-winner depicts the influence of a secretive matriarchal religious order in Lebanon on three generations of women in the Chehab family – one being director Jude Chehab. Information is here.

“Hollow Tree” documentary screening with Q&A from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the Hayden Library Building at 160 Memorial Drive at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. Free, but register. A coming-of-age in the climate crisis from the perspectives of three young women (Indigenous, white and Angolan) living in Louisiana who meet engineers, activists and Indigenous leaders to learn how humans shaped the Mississippi and why there are cypress-tree graveyards and billowing smokestacks in their sinking state. A moderated Q&A with the director, producer and the three teens follows. Information is here.

Meditation group from 5:20 to 6 p.m. at The Foundry, 101 Rogers St., East Cambridge (and every Friday). Free, but register to save your spot. Start the weekend feeling fresh and centered during this class unaffiliated with any religion or ideology. Information is here.

Wicked Queer Film Fest at 6:30 p.m. at The Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle St., Harvard Square, Cambridge (and continuing through April 14). $13 to $15. The film “Febrero” launches the 40th year of this LGBTQ media event, the largest in New England, screening more than 45 films at The Brattle and locations in Boston. Many are premieres and many are attended by the filmmakers (as this one is). Information is here.

Fareed Zakaria reads from “Age of Revolutions: Progress and Backlash from 1600 to the Present” at 7 p.m. at First Parish in Cambridge Meeting House, 3 Church St./1446 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square. $12, or $38 with book. During this Harvard Book Store event, the author and host of CNN’s “Fareed Zakaria GPS” explains that we can learn a lot about our world by understanding the eras and movements that have shaken norms and helped shape it. Author and Harvard psychology professor Steven Pinker joins in conversation. Information is here.

The Rockwell is Not a Joke Fest with Kate Sisk at 7 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. $15 to $18 and all ages. Six nights of comedy. This time, the Brooklyn professional comedian and amateur drag king Kate Sisk, who was once a member of the Puerto Rico Women’s National Soccer Team and is now a trans person. Information is here.

Anna Funder reads from “Wifedom: Mrs. Orwell’s Invisible Life” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. In this ode to the unsung work of women everywhere, the author of “All That I Am” reveals through newly discovered letters how Eileen O’Shaughnessy, the wife of George Orwell, was a brilliant writer and a crucial partner to him in his work. Information is here.

Bow Market Comedy Festival with Comedy Party/Unmask the Laughs shows at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. at Upstairs at Bow, 1 Bow Market Way, Union Square, Somerville. $20. Seven nights of comedy, each with a different lineup of local comedians, plus drinks. Tonight: Mary Spadaro, Alex Giampapa and Troy Burditt (7 p.m.) and “special guest” (9 p.m.) Information is here.

United Dance presents “Carnival of the Animals” at 7 p.m. at Multicultural Arts Center, 41 Second St., East Cambridge (also Apr 6). $15 to $40 and all ages. The world premiere of a narrated dance by Gianni Di Marco, performed by youth and young adults with Down Syndrome who’ve trained with professional dancers and choreographers using adaptive dance techniques. Information is here.

Don Winslow reads from “City in Ruins” at 7 p.m. at St. James’s Episcopal Church, 1991 Massachusetts Ave., Porter Square, Cambridge. $37 to $42 with book. The award-winning author of 25 books wraps up his “City of” trilogy with an epic crime novel of love and hate, ambition and desperation, vengeance and compassion, set mostly in Las Vegas. He says it’s his final book. Information is here.

Kerri Powers performs at 7 p.m. at The Burren, 247 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. $10 to $25. The New England blues-and-soul artist’s last album “Love is Why” explores that universal emotion and its huge influence on our decisions. Information is here.

Boston Progressive Jazz Festival from 7 to 11:30 p.m. at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. $15. During this inaugural event, five Boston groups push definitions of jazz in radically different directions. Featuring the Voodoo Baby Aliens, the New Jazz Orchestra, the Niko Malinowski Quintet, Ebba Dankel Group and Ali Tahir’s THICC Orchestra. Information is here.

“Spring Awakening” musical (continued) at 7:30 p.m. at Loeb Drama Center, 64 Brattle St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $10 to $15. Information is here.

The Fromm Players at Harvard present “Piano: Sonic Revolutions” at 7:30 p.m. at Harvard’s John Knowles Paine Concert Hall, 3 Oxford St., just north of Harvard Square, Cambridge, and Harvard Yard (and continuing through April 7). Free, but reserve your spot. Four concerts showcase two new Steinway D grand pianos; they include solo and duo works with video, electronics and live interactions. Information is here.

Twin Tribes, Urban Heat and Dancing Plague perform at 7:30 p.m. at Sonia, 10 Brookline St., Central Square, Cambridge. $25 and 18-plus. Two ’80s-influenced bands and one dark electro solo act. Information is here.

Long Autumn performs at 7:30 p.m. at Aeronaut Brewing, 14 Tyler St., near Union Square, Somerville. Free. A five-piece nu alt/dark pop band from Boston. Information is here. 

Trumpeter Marquis Hill performs at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. at Regattabar, 1 Bennett St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $20 to $30. The musician, composer and bandleader brings together contemporary and classic jazz, hip-hop, R&B, Chicago house and neo-soul. Information is here.

Josephine Foster performs from 7:30 to 10 p.m. at Lilypad, 1353 Cambridge St., Inman Square, Cambridge. $15 to $25. On her latest album “Domestic Sphere” the Colorado composer who fuses art song with American folk performs with her electric guitar, then goes experimental, subverting the usual range of her voice. Information is here.

A Cappella with Harvard’s  Krokodiloes and Opportunes at 8 p.m. at Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. $10 to $20. Harvard’s oldest a cappella groups transport you to the smoky jazz clubs of the past with soulful renditions of classic jazz standards (the evening’s subtitled “College KrOppout: A Startup Jam”). Information is here.

“Beyond Words” (continued) at 8 p.m. at Central Square Theater, Cambridge, 450 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, Cambridge. $24 to $78. Information is here.

Jason Mantzoukas in 2016. (Photo: Gage Skidmore via Flickr)

Immediate Gratification Players with Jason Mantzoukas from 8 to 9 p.m. in Hall B at the Harvard Science Center, 1 Oxford St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. $7. The Harvard improv troupe’s person of the year (from “Brooklyn 99,” “The Good Place,” “Parks and Recreation” and much more) joins in and receives the signature yellow-and-red tie. Information is here.

Caña Dulce y Caña Brava performs at 8 p.m. at Club Passim, 47 Palmer St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $25 to $30. The group is renowned nationally and internationally for interpreting the music, poetry, dance and attire of Veracruz, Mexico. Information is here.

Candlelight: Coldplay concert at 9 p.m. at First Church in Cambridge, 11 Garden St., Harvard Square. $33 to $59 and 8-plus. The Rasa String Quartet, illuminated by glowing candles, plays hits from the chart-topping British rock band. Information is here.

Dante’s Salsa Inferno with DJ titans of Rhode Island from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the Dante Alighieri Society Center, 41 Hampshire St., Kendall Square, Cambridge. $5 to $20 and 21-plus. Salsa and bachata tunes from DJs Al Riv, Black Mamba and Locura. The evening starts with an hourlong bachata lesson, no partner necessary, followed by social dancing. Information is here.


Saturday, April 6

MIT hosts a K–12 Climate Action and Education Conference on Saturday (via Eventbrite)

K–12 Climate Action and Education Conference from 9:40 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Building 32, also known as the Ray and Maria Stata Center, at 32 Vassar St., Cambridge. Free, but register. Interactive climate workshops on education and activism for teachers and high school students, plus a climate solutions panel and a deep dive into the new high school curriculum by MIT’s Climate Action Through Education program. Information is here.

Boston Women’s Parkour Workshop from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at The Dojo at Somernova, 15 Properzi Way, in Ward 2, Somerville, between Porter and Union squares. $10 to $75 and ages 14-plus (free for high school students). All women, transgender women and nonbinary participants at all abilities and fitness levels can experience parkour with instructors Ruby Romero from New York City and Wendy Kinal from Boulder, Colorado. Half-day and full-day sessions, plus a film screening with pizza. Information is here.

Somerville Winter Farmers Market final day from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free. It’s the end of the season for this indoor market with 71-plus local food growers and product makers. Information is here.

Comedy Workshops with Kate Sisk at 12:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. $35 to $45 and all ages. The Brooklyn professional comedian offers two-hour workshops on improv comedy and beginner standup. Information is here.

“Open Space: Life at Cambridge’s Danehy Park” film screening at 1 p.m. at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free and all ages, but register. One theme from Federico Muchnik’s documentary, which focuses on the varied mix of people and activities that take place in the 50-acre park, is that being in nature helps us become a better version of ourselves. Information is here.

Discover Mount Auburn walking tour from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at Mount Auburn Cemetery, 580 Mount Auburn St., West Cambridge. $10, but registration is required. A history-infused 1.5-mile walking tour of this National Historic Landmark, which is the final resting place of nearly 100,000 people – including many famous ones – along with being home to 700 species and varieties of trees, beautiful sculpture and gloriously gloomy tombs and mausoleums. Information is here.

United Dance presents “Carnival of the Animals” (continued) at 1:30 p.m. at Multicultural Arts Center, 41 Second St., East Cambridge. $15 to $40 and all ages. Information is here.

Bridging Divides: Empowering Generations with Generative AI from 2 to 4 p.m. the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free, but register and 18-plus. A gentle introduction to generative artificial intelligence and its current risks, opportunities, tools and trends. Connect with professionals from various industries and hear how tech uses generative AI for positive outcomes. Information is here.

“Spring Awakening” musical (continued) at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at Loeb Drama Center, 64 Brattle St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $10 to $15. Information is here.

Children’s Children’s Chorus performs at 2:30 p.m. in the Calderwood Courtyard at the Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. Some of the pieces performed are directly inspired by the “LaToya M. Hobbs: It’s Time” exhibition on Level 3. Information is here.

Ellen Rounseville exhibition closing reception from 3 to 5 p.m. at the café at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. Free. Rounseville’s “La Titiritera” exhibit which narrates stories in oil paint closes on April 7. Information is here.

“Beyond Words” (continued) at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. at Central Square Theater, Cambridge, 450 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, Cambridge. $24 to $78. Information is here.

Harvard Ballroom Dance Team presents “Vignettes” at 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. at Harvard’s Lowell Lecture Hall, 17 Kirkland St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $7 to $10. A showcase of the team’s efforts, with 16 pieces this year featuring tales of falling in love and stories celebrating life’s joys. Information is here.

“Inundation District” film screening and panel discussion from 6 to 8 p.m. at MIT Museum. $5 to $15. A film by Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter David Abel about Boston’s fateful decision to spend billions erecting a new district along the coast even after scientists had warned of the threat of sea level rise. A discussion with Abel and professors of urban planning and architecture follows. Information is here.

First Annual Global Arts Live Gala and Concert with Angélique Kidjo at 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at the Crystal Ballroom and the Somerville Theatre, 55 Davis Square. $60 to $75 for the 7:30 p.m. concert only; $175 for the 5:30 p.m. gala, concert and after-party. An Afro-pop tour de force, Beninese star Angélique Kidjo brings her musical influences and captivating voice to this fundraiser. Dorchester’s globally inspired Comfort Kitchen caters the pre-concert gala and the late-night bites for the after-party featuring the African band Mokoomba, whose music styles range from soukous to soul. Information is here.

Electronic Multimedia Music Night from 5:30 to 10:45 p.m. at The Foundry, 101 Rogers St., East Cambridge. $15. Musicians perform experimental and electronic music live while visual artists create projections. DJ Cozy opens and closes. Information is here.

The Rockwell is Not a Joke Fest with Mark Ellis at 7 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. $25 to $30 and all ages. Six nights of comedy. This time, the headlining standup, actor and former online co-host of Movie Trivia Schmoedown. Information is here.

Analog By Choice presents “Ibarra, Ichmouratov and Ives” at 7 p.m. at New School of Music, 25 Lowell St., West Cambridge. Free, but donations suggested. Boston chamber musicians employ photographic works to underscore concepts of memory, time and how we attempt to spend and preserve it. Famed and lesser-known composers are paired by the letters that start their names. Information is here.

Comedian and actor Anna Arkana presents “It Gets Darker” at 7 p.m. at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. $28. Arkana (on Comedy Central’s “Corporate” and lead and executive producer of YouTube’s “Youth & Consequences”) has a hybrid of stand-up and one-woman show meant to bring light to people who’ve experienced extreme darkness. Information is here.

Songwriters in the Round from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rooted Café at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville. $15. Taking turns playing songs this time are event host (and novelist) Terry Kitchen; local guitar teacher Ksenia Mack, who adds fiery vocals atop a unique guitar-playing style; and Thea Hopkins, a member of the Aquinnah Wampanoag tribe who calls her acclaimed music Red Roots Americana and has an album out in May. Information is here.

Bow Market Comedy Festival with Comedy Showcases at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. at Upstairs at Bow, 1 Bow Market Way, Union Square, Somerville. $20. Seven nights of comedy, each with a different lineup of local comedians, plus drinks. Tonight: Carrie Coughlin, John Anderson, Andrew Vickers, Corey Percival, Josh Filipowski, Katie Arroyo and Peter Martin (7 p.m.) and Spencer Cannistraro, Kyle Seeley, Tiny, Carolina Montesquieu, Dan Doherty, Zach Valencia and Chris Post (9 p.m.). Information is here.

Hubbub Comedy at 7:30 p.m. at Lamplighter CX, 110 N. First St., North Point, Cambridge. $15 to $20 and 21-plus. Write a question at the door and the comics may answer it live on stage. Information is here.

La Tragédie de Carmen (continued) at 7:30 p.m. at Arrow Street Arts, 2 Arrow Street, Harvard Square, Cambridge. $20 to $50. Information is here.

Ginger Ibex and Jane Park perform at 7:30 p.m. at The Green Room, 62 Bow St., Union Square, Somerville. $15 and all ages. The Poor Eliza singer-songwriter Jane Park opens on her guitar for Ginger Ibex, with haunting folk-pop melodies involving a variety of stringed instruments. Information is here.

The Fromm Players at Harvard present “Piano: Sonic Revolutions” (continued) at 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. at Harvard’s John Knowles Paine Concert Hall, 3 Oxford St., just north of Harvard Square, Cambridge, and Harvard Yard. Free, but reserve your spot. Information is here.

Music of the Americas with Danilo Pérez at 8 p.m. at Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. $8 to $15. The Harvard Jazz Orchestra honors its 2024 Harvard Jazz Master in Residence. Information is here.

Maria Friedman and Friends concert from 8 to 10 p.m. at Distler Performance Hall, Tufts University, 20 Talbot Ave., Medford. Free for the general public; email to reserve tickets before 10 a.m. on April 5 or pick up unclaimed tickets 15 minutes before the show. Songs and stories by the musical theater award-winning actor. Friedman also directed the current surprise hit of Broadway, the revival of “Merrily We Roll Along” with Daniel Radcliffe. Information is here.

Swing City Boston Swing Lesson and Dancing at 8 p.m. to midnight at the West Cambridge Youth Center, 680 Huron Ave. $17 to $20. An hourlong lesson on East Coast/six-step swing followed by social dancing to The River Street Six Band live. An optional free lesson on Charleston footwork, combination steps and styling starts at 6:30 p.m. Information is here. 

“Heroes” Night from 9 p.m. at 2 a.m. at ManRay, 40 Prospect St., Central Square, Cambridge (and every Saturday). $12 to $15 and 19-plus. DJ Chris Ewen mixes ’80s new wave, electro, post-punk and a bit of old-school goth + industrial. Information is here.

Charlene Kaye presents “Tiger Daughter, or How I Brought My Immigrant Mother Ultimate Shame” at 9:30 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. $15 to $20 and 21-plus. The Rockwell is Not a Joke Fest wraps up with this new solo show by the actor and musician about “what happens when you rebel against your immigrant Chinese Tiger Mom’s dreams of you playing Carnegie Hall by age 12, and instead become a slutty shredder in an all-girl Guns N’ Roses cover band.” Information is here.


Sunday, April 7

The 5K Cambridge City Run/Walk (via City of Cambridge)

5K Cambridge City Run/Walk at 9 a.m. (participants register at 7:30 a.m.) on the service road behind the Water Department facility at 250 Fresh Pond Parkway, in West Cambridge at Fresh Pond, Cambridge. $25 to $35 (free for Cambridge and East Boston high school students and those under 18). This 5K loop around Fresh Pond, to benefit Friends of Cambridge Athletics and the Andrea Harvey Memorial Fund, takes place along historic trails and pathways and  woods within Fresh Pond Reservation. Information is here.

Heart Hive presents “Ecstatic Dance [Cosmic Balance]” from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Masonic Lodge, 1950 Massachusetts Ave., Porter Square, Cambridge. $15 to $30 (free for children under 5). A chance to dance without shoes, words, alcohol or phones. Features DJ Luminus. Information is here.

New School of Music Performathon ’24 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the New School of Music, 25 Lowell St., West Cambridge. Donations accepted. This full day of student recitals raises funds for NSM scholarships and upkeep of NSM instruments. Includes post-concert receptions all day in Room B. Information is here.

Weird Al drag brunch from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Summer Shack, 149 Alewife Brook Parkway, Alewife, Cambridge. $20. Performers have a wild time interpreting Al Yankovic’s kooky songs while you struggle to stop laughing so you can eat your brunch. Hosted by Neon Calypso, hopefully playing an accordion. Information is here.

Amazing Archaeology Fair from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology, 11 Divinity Ave., and the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East, 6 Divinity Ave., in the Baldwin neighborhood near Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free and all ages with museum admission. Chat with archaeologists who study ancient civilizations and help students analyze archaeological evidence. Try cuneiform writing and a new app that animates detailed wall art in Assyrian palaces. Peer beneath a Cambridge burial ground with a virtual reality experience, and enjoy a range of hands-on activities. Information is here.

“Beyond Words” (continued) at 2 p.m. at Central Square Theater, Cambridge, 450 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, Cambridge. $24 to $78. Information is here.

LGBTQ Improv Comedy from 2 to 4 p.m. at CultureHouse, 64 Union Square, Somerville. Free, but register. Hang out, talk and do some improv. Information is here.

Iron River Singers perform powwow music from 2 to 4 p.m. at Distler Performance Hall, Tufts University, 20 Talbot Ave., Medford. Free. The local Northern-style singing group brings together members of several nations. Director Chris Newell provides an introduction on key elements to understand the sounds and culture before performances at 3 p.m. A post-concert reception follows in the lobby. Information is here.

La Tragédie de Carmen (continued) at 3 p.m. at Arrow Street Arts, 2 Arrow Street, Harvard Square, Cambridge. $20 to $50. Information is here.

Bilingual Storytelling: “Madre Monte” from 3 to 4 p.m. at Somerville Public Library, 79 Highland Ave., Central Hill. Free, but register. Family-oriented Spanish immersion, this time featuring the Colombian legend of the moss-covered half-woman, half-mountain protector of nature, told in Spanish and English, plus music, dance, games and arts and crafts. Information is here.

Stravinsky, Strauss and Schumann from 3 to 5 p.m. at Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy St., near Harvard Square. $9 to $68. Nine musicians from the Boston Chamber Music Society perform Igor Stravinsky’s Suite from “L’Histoire du Soldat” (1920); Richard Strauss’ “Metamorphosen” for String Septet (1945); and Robert Schumann’s Piano Quintet in E-flat major, Op. 44 (1842). Information is here.

Poetry for Grief and Healing with Amanda Shea from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in Bigelow Chapel at Mount Auburn Cemetery, 580 Mount Auburn St., West Cambridge. $15 to $20. Workshop led by the poet, “artivist” and two-time winner of the Boston Music Award for spoken word artist of the year (2022 and 2023). Includes a meditation, writing prompts and an invitation to share with the group. No previous writing experience is required. Information is here.

Drummer Jean-Marie Corrois and his new quartet perform from 3:30 to 6 p.m. at Lilypad, 1353 Cambridge St., Inman Square, Cambridge. Free. Corrois has played drums for 40 years in France and the United States, and today is accompanied by Nick Grondin on guitar, Ed Spargo on bass and Ben Barreiro on sax. Information is here.

Poets Mary Buchinger, Laynie Browne and Maya Pindyck read at 4 p.m. at The Press Room at 90 Oxford St., in the Spring Hill neighborhood, Somerville. $5 suggested donation. For his Xit the Bear Reading, Michael Franco brings together Buchinger, who serves on the board of the New England Poetry Club, and Browne and Pindyck, who teach writing at Philadelphia colleges. Information is here. 

Activist Afternoons from 4 to 6 p.m. at St. James’s Episcopal Church, 1991 Massachusetts Ave., Porter Square, Cambridge (and the first and third Sunday of every month). Free. Drop-in and write postcards, do phone banking and more focused on promoting civic engagement and social justice across the country. Information is here.

Attacca School of Music Faculty Concert from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at Somerville Music Spaces, 1060 Broadway, Suite C101B, Somerville. $12 to $25. The Belmont school’s faculty perform on a mix of instruments and in different ensembles and styles to raise funds for expansion efforts. A small reception follows. Information is here.

Bow Market Comedy Festival with Spare Tire Sketch Comedy at 7 p.m. at Upstairs at Bow, 1 Bow Market Way, Union Square, Somerville. $20. Seven nights of comedy, each with a different lineup of local comedians, plus drinks. Tonight: an untitled show of sketch comedy featuring special guests. Information is here.

Comedy Night at Remnant Satellite at 7 p.m. at Remnant Brewing Satellite, 877 Cambridge St., Wellington-Harrington, Cambridge. $10 and 21-plus. A monthly showcase of comedians from the Boston area and occasionally farther. Information is here.

The Fromm Players at Harvard present “Piano: Sonic Revolutions” (continued) at 7:30 p.m. at Harvard’s John Knowles Paine Concert Hall, 3 Oxford St., just north of Harvard Square, Cambridge, and Harvard Yard. Free, but reserve your spot. Information is here.

Rizo and Walter Sickert & the Army of Broken Toys perform at 8 p.m. at Somerville Theatre’s Crystal Ballroom, 55 Davis Square. $25 to $30 and all ages. Through songs, stories, performance art, comedy and glamour Rizo explores the nature of home and identity, reflecting on returning to Oregon, being an art hippie child in New York City and global travel. In contrast, the “Dada-esque circus carnival run amuck” that’s Boston’s Army of Broken Toys brings a musical troupe wielding a wild mix of instruments including a glockenspiel. Information is here.


Monday, April 8

Environmental artist Xavier Cortada in 2015 (via Facebook)

“Creative Climate Action: Can Art Save Us from Rising Seas?” at 4 p.m. at the Knafel Center of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, 10 Garden St., west of Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. The Miami eco-artist Xavier Cortada has created art at the North and South poles and across six continents. He discusses how he transforms public spaces into platforms for storytelling and learning. Information is here.

The Environment Forum: Writer Margaret Renkl at 6 p.m. in Room 113 at Sever Hall in Harvard Yard, near Broadway and Quincy Street, Cambridge. Free. The Nashville, Tennessee, contributing opinion writer for The New York Times and author of three books – the most recent being “The Comfort of Crows: A Backyard Year” speaks with Robin Kelsey, dean of arts and humanities at Harvard. Sponsored by Harvard’s Mahindra Center. Information is here. 

“Techne: Evidence in the Anthropocene” with artist Daniel R. Small from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Bartos Theater, 20 Ames St., Building E-15-070, Kendall Square, Cambridge. Free, but register. The Los Angeles artist and educator presents galactic and planetary evidence from scientists and artist-investigators about deep time and the fate of the human species. Information is here.

O’Neill Branch Book Group from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Cambridge Public Library O’Neill Branch, 70 Rindge Ave., North Cambridge. Free. This month’s selection: “Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants” by Robin Wall Kimmerer. Information is here.

Monday’s Pages from 7 to 10 p.m. at Out of the Blue Too Art Gallery and More, third floor of Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville (and every other Monday). Free. All are welcome to this cold reading series where actors and writers get together to work on their crafts. Information is here.

“Traces” film screening at 7:30 p.m. at Apple Cinemas Cambridge, 168 Alewife Brook Parkway, Cambridge Highlands near Alewife and Fresh Pond. $12. Dubravka Turic’s film debut about a lonely anthropologist researching an ancient burial ritual practiced in the mountains of Croatia is part of the Belmont World Film’s 22nd International Film Series. Shown with English subtitles and followed by a talk with fiction translator Ellen Elias-Bursać. Information is here.

Iniko performs at 8 p.m. at The Sinclair, 52 Church St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $30. The Brooklyn native fuses sinewy vocals, the musicality of a multi-instrumentalist and an adventurous imagination to create a type of cosmic, other-worldly soul. Information is here.

Poets Cindy Juyoung Ok and Andrea Cohen read from 8 to 9 p.m. at Cambridge Center for Adult Education, 56 Brattle St., Harvard Square. $5. Juyoung Ok’s “Ward Toward” is her debut collection; Cohen’s “The Sorrow Apartments” was just published. Sponsored by the Blacksmith House Poetry Series, which brings established and emerging writers of poetry and fiction to Harvard Square. Information is here.


Tuesday, April 9

Jason De Léon reads from “Soldiers and Kings: Survival and Hope in the World of Human Smuggling” from 4 to 5:30 p.m. at Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Building 56, Room 114, 21 Ames St., Cambridge. Free. The UCLA professor discusses his study on the daily lives of smugglers who transport migrants through Mexico and the relationship between transnational gangs and the clandestine migration industry. Information is here.

Valentina Rozas-Krause (via the professor’s Instagram)

Valentina Rozas-Krause reads from “Breaking the Bronze Ceiling: Women, Memory and Public Space” from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at Harvard University’s Center for Government and International Studies, 1730 Cambridge St., Harvard Square. Free. The professor of architecture at Chile’s Adolfo Ibáñez University discusses the absence of women memorialized in public art. Joining in conversation are Harvard professors Patricio del Real and Sanderijn Cels as well as Paul M. Farber of Monument Lab. Information is here.

“Mi Vida Musical”: Carlos Prieto in conversation and concert from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Samberg Conference Center, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge. Free. The Mexican-born author of 14 books discusses his new memoir, being an engineering student at MIT and his careers running an iron and steel company and as a cellist performing with Yo-Yo Ma and others. The talk will be followed by performances of J.S. Bach’s Cello Suite No. 3 and Eugenio Toussaint’s “Bachriation.” Valerie Chen will perform Phillip Glass’ “Orbit.” Information is here. 

“The Thunder, Perfect Mind” lecture and performance from 5 to 7 p.m. in the James Room at Swartz Hall, 45 Francis Ave., Harvard Divinity School, in the Baldwin neighborhood near the Somerville border, Cambridge. Free, but register. An evening celebrating the ancient poem written in the voice of a divine female speaker with a reading followed by academic lectures, musical compositions and a reception. Information is here.

Michael Norton reads from “The Ritual Effect: From Habit to Ritual, Harness the Surprising Power of Everyday Actions” at 6 p.m. in the lecture hall at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free, or $29.75 with book. During this event co-sponsored with the Harvard Book Store, the Harvard Business School professor argues for more mindfulness in ordinary acts. Boston Public Radio’s Jim Braude joins in conversation.

Board game night for adults from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Cambridge Public Library Valente Branch, 826 Cambridge St., Wellington-Harrington, Cambridge. Free, but register. Play Ticket to Ride, Settlers of Catan, Scrabble, chess, checkers, Boggle, Bananagrams and more, or bring a board game to play with others. Pizza and beverages provided. Information is here.

Racial Inequities in Maternal Health panel discussion from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Cambridge Community Center, 5 Callender St., Riverside. Free, but register. State officials, academics, advocates and others on birthing outcomes for people of color and legislative issues regarding maternal health policy. Hosted by Health Resources in Action, the YWCA Cambridge and State Representative Marjorie C Decker. Information is here.

“Book Moot” discusses “Boy’s Weekend” by Mattie Lubchansky at 6:30 p.m. at Pandemonium Books & Games, 4 Pleasant St., Central Square, Cambridge. Free, or $28 with the book and registration required. This month, a graphic novel about a newly out trans artist’s assistant who uncomfortably agrees to attend an old friend’s bachelor weekend, then discovers a mysterious cult also staying at the hotel is ritually dismembering guests to satisfy a bloodthirsty god. Information is here.

Knitting group from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Cambridge Public Library’s Boudreau Branch, 245 Concord Ave. Observatory Hill in Neighborhood 9. Free. Bring yarn and needles and find out what fellow knitters are up to. Information is here.

Rett Madison performs at 7 p.m. at Club Passim, 47 Palmer St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $16 to $18. Originally from West Virginia, the Los Angeles singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist has sung backing vocals for Lorde and Kate Nash with a style “brazen and vulnerable” (says Rolling Stone). Lou Roy opens. Information is here.

Henriette Lazaridis reads from “Last Days in Plaka” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The author of “The Clover House” and “Terra Nova” discusses her new novel about a complicated friendship between a Greek American woman and an older woman in present-day Athens. Marjan Kamali, bestselling author of “The Stationary Shop,” joins in conversation. Information is here.

Romance book group from 7:15 to 8:15 p.m. at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free. A book discussion group for teens and adults. This month: “The Bride Test” by Helen Hoang. Information is here.

Comedian Jena Friedman performs at 7:30 p.m. at Somerville Theatre’s Crystal Ballroom, 55 Davis Square. $26. The Oscar-nominated writer and comedian and creator of the acclaimed stand-up special “Ladykiller” offers up a new hour that’s her most personal yet. Information is here.

Point01 Percent at 7:30 p.m. at Lilypad, 1353 Cambridge St., Inman Square, Cambridge. $15. A cross-pollination of area musical improvisers (with guest Lao Dan visiting from China). At 7:30 p.m., Lao Dan (sax/flutes), Greg Kelley (trumpet) and Glynis Loman (cello). At 8:30 p.m., Noah Campbell (sax), Pandelis Karayorgis (piano) and Brittany Karlson (bass). Information is here.


Wednesday, April 10

Hahrie Han.

Hahrie Han on “Stories of Democracy Realized” at 4 p.m. at Harvard’s John Knowles Paine Concert Hall, 3 Oxford St., just north of Harvard Square, Cambridge, and Harvard Yard (and also April 11). Free. The director of the Agora Institute at Johns Hopkins University gives two lectures exploring how people and communities do (and do not) practice democracy, with a focus on the relationship of faith, race and politics. Danielle Allen of Harvard’s Allen Lab for Democracy Renovation joins in conversation. Information is here.

“Russia’s Center-Regional Relations in Time of War” lecture from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at Harvard University’s Center for Government and International Studies, South Concourse, S354, 1730 Cambridge St., Harvard Square. Free. Expert and author Irina Busygina presents addresses war’s impact on Russia’s regions and possible tipping points. The Davis Center’s Alexandra Vacroux joins in conversation. Information is here.

Kaley Lane Eaton performs at 5 p.m. at the Longy School of Music, 27 Garden St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free to $20. The composer, pianist and classical singer turned folk and neo-jazz singer-songwriter exudes influences of Joni Mitchell, Kate Bush and Laurie Anderson. Helped by guitarist and bouzouki player Rian Souleles, she offers a stripped-down version of her just-released album “Lookout.” Information is here.

“The Antisocial Network: Memes to Mayhem” free film screening plus Q&A at 5:45 p.m. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Building 45, known as the Schwarzman College of Computing, at 51 Vassar St., Cambridge. Free. Yes, the documentary about Internet trolling becoming IRL is on Netflix by now, but this screening’s Q&A includes directors Giorgio Angelini and Arthur Jones talking with moderator Gabriella Coleman of Harvard’s anthropology department and author of “Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous.” Information is here.

An Evening with Twinkie Clark: A Conversation and Recital at 6 p.m. in the James Room at Swartz Hall, 45 Francis Ave., Harvard Divinity School, in the Baldwin neighborhood near the Somerville border, Cambridge. Free, but register. The Grammy-winning gospel artist talks with Harvard’s Charisse Barron and Damien Sneed, then performs selections from her 350-plus song catalog on a Hammond B3-organ. Information is here.

Sharon Malone reads from “Grown Woman Talk: Your Guide to Getting and Staying Healthy” at 6 p.m. at The Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $10, or $38 with book. For this Harvard Book Store event, Malone discusses her book about the most common conditions dealt with by women over 40, especially Black women, offering straight-forward advice on how women can structure their health care experience to get the care they’re deserved. WBUR senior correspondent Deborah Becker joins in conversation. Information is here.

Urban Cycling Basics and Rules of the Road Workshop from 6 to 7 p.m. in the first floor conference room at Harvard University Health Services, 75 Mount Auburn St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. An introduction to help build confidence for riding in a city. This session covers rules of the road and traffic laws that apply to bicycles, plus topics such as right of way, yielding and traffic markings. Information is here.

Nell Freudenberger reads from “The Limits” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The author of the award-winning “Lucky Girls” discusses her new novel set mostly in New York City and following the intersecting lives of two teens, one privileged and the other struggling. Emily Bernard, author of “Black is the Body,” joins in conversation. Information is here.

Poets Richard Fein and Gary Whited read from 7 to 8 p.m. at Grolier Poetry Book Shop on 6 Plympton St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. $5 to $10, but register. With an introduction by George Kalogeris. Information is here.

Ms. Ezra Furman Doing What She Wants at 7:30 p.m. at The Rockwell, 255 Elm St., Davis Square, Somerville. $20 and 18-plus. The acclaimed singer-songwriter who provided much of the soundtrack for the TV show “Sex Education” performs in an intimate space. Information is here.

“Beyond Words” (continued) at 7:30 p.m. at Central Square Theater, Cambridge, 450 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, Cambridge. $24 to $78. Information is here.

“From Seville to Isfahan” concert of music of the Spanish Renaissance with Persian/Ottoman masterpieces from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at First Church in Cambridge, 11 Garden St., Harvard Square. $25 to $50. A touring collaboration of the Montreal Ensemble Constantinople and viola da gamba virtuoso Fahmi Alqhai with his Accademia del Piacere, a leading early Spanish music ensemble. Information is here.

Fifth Annual MIT Music and Theater Arts Playwright’s Lab reading at 8 p.m. at MIT Music and Theater Arts, 345 Vassar St., in the MIT/Area II neighborhood, Cambridge. Free, but RSVP to save your spot. A five-week festival of staged readings featuring the work of the writers in the Playwrights Lab. Tonight: “Last Night at the Observatory” by Park Jiwoo, a story about Jisu, who was born with the mind and body of a 20-year-old, and how a novel about a physicist with a tumor on his head may hold the key to the meaning of Jisu’s life. Information is here.

“Crypt” Night at 9 p.m. at ManRay, 40 Prospect St., Central Square, Cambridge (and every Wednesday in April). $7 to $10 and 19-plus. DJ Arcanus mixes old-school goth and industrial. Creative attire encouraged. Information is here.


Thursday, April 11

Andrew Kemp on “Sea-Level Change in Boston: A Story in 3 Acts” from noon to 1 p.m. at Curtis Hall’s multipurpose room, Tufts University, 474 Boston Ave., Medford. Free. The Tufts earth and climate science professor describes how using salt-marsh sediment as a geological archive extends our knowledge of sea level change in Boston going back 4,000 years, and sheds light on the causes of long- and short-term sea-level change. Also via Zoom. Information is here.

Hahrie Han on “Stories of Democracy Realized” (continued) at 4 p.m. at Harvard’s John Knowles Paine Concert Hall, 3 Oxford St., just north of Harvard Square, Cambridge, and Harvard Yard. Free. Information is here.

21st Annual Summer Urban Program Auction by Phillips Brooks House at 5 p.m. at Gutman Conference Center at Harvard Graduate School of Education, 6 Appian Way, Harvard Square, Cambridge. $25 to $50. Fundraiser to support the student-run summer camps that serve more than 700 youth and teens in Boston and Cambridge. Heavy appetizers, open bar and live music plus silent and live auctions for exclusive items and experiences. Information is here.

Starr Forum with Yasheng Huang, author of “China: The Rise and Fall of the EAST” from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Building 66, also known as The Landau Building, Room 110, 25 Ames St., Cambridge. Free. The subtitle explains those all-caps: “How Exams, Autocracy, Stability and Technology Brough China Success, and Why They Might Lead to Its Decline.” Huang is a professor of global economics at MIT’s Sloan School of Management and directs the MIT-China Program. Wired magazine senior writer Will Knight joins in conversation. Information is here.

John Urschel and Louisa Thomas discuss the memoir “Mind and Matter: A Life in Math and Football” from 5 to 7:30 p.m. in The Nexus community space on the first floor of the Hayden Library Building at 160 Memorial Drive at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. Free, but RSVP. Co-authors and a couple, Urschel is a former offensive lineman for the Baltimore Ravens and an assistant math professor at MIT; Thomas is an author of two nonfiction books of history and a contributor to The New Yorker. Information is here.

Tara K. Menon (via the author’s website)

“Spoken Words: Speech, Character and Social Worlds in 19th Century British Novels” lecture and Q&A at 6 p.m. in the Thompson Room of Harvard University’s Barker Center, 12 Quincy St., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. For her book-in-progress, Tara K. Menon describes using computational tools and close literary analysis to reveal how direct speech shapes our understanding of literary characters in novels by Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte and George Eliot. Information is here.

Marc W. Pollina reads from “The Boston Marathon Handbook” from 6 to 7 p.m. at The Harvard Coop, 1400 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The entrepreneur and completer of 26 marathons discusses his definitive field guide to the Boston Marathon for participants, aspirants on the cusp of participating and athletes who dream of participating. Information is here.

North Cambridge History Center opening party from 6 to 8 p.m. at 2322 Massachusetts Ave. next to Frank’s Steakhouse, North Cambridge. Free. Check out this two-month pop-up designed for learning some hyperlocal history. Bring your curiosity, knowledge and photos of you and friends playing in the ’hood as kids. Part of the Center’s yearlong focus on North Cambridge. Light refreshments served. Information is here.

Malia C. Lazu reads from “From Intention to Impact: A Practical Guide to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion” from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway, Mid-Cambridge. Free, but register. The MIT Sloan School lecturer, DEI strategist and entrepreneur discusses the hurdles to systemic change and provides a map for creating inclusive environments. My Brother’s Keeper Cambridge founder Tony Clark joins the conversation. The first 100 guests will get a free copy of Lazu’s book courtesy of MBK and the Central Square Business Improvement District. (This event was originally scheduled for March 18.) Information is here.  

After Dark Series: Grow from 6 to 9 p.m. at The MIT Museum, 314 Main St., Kendall Square, Cambridge. $10 to $20 and 21-plus. Learn about fungi, local foraging techniques and musical mushroom modulation and meet an MIT-trained architect trying to answer the question “Can we grow buildings?” Hand rolls from Pagu and craft beers from Arlington Brewing Company are available for purchase. Information is here.

Timothy Archambault on “The Silent Echo: Architectures of the Void” from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Gund Hall, 42 Quincy St., near Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The Miami architect and Indigenous flutist and composer discusses the relationship between the void, Indigenous and modern architecture, music archaeology and the process of revitalizing traditions within Indigenous flute music. He summarizes with a flute performance. Information is here.

Ismar Volić reads from “Making Democracy Count: How Mathematics Improves Voting, Electoral Maps and Representation” at 7 p.m. at Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge. Free. The director of the Institute for Mathematics and Democracy at Wellesley College argues that democracy is mathematical to its very foundations, and mathematical thinking as an objective, nonpartisan framework can create civic infrastructure that works for everyone. Wellesley math professor Andrew Schultz joins in conversation. Information is here.

Pub Sing from 7 to 10 p.m. at the café at Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville (and the second Thursday of each month). Free. A pub-style singalong where anyone is welcome to lead – drinking songs, sea chanteys and any song with a singable chorus will be appreciated! Information is here.

Blues Union April Classes and Dances from 7 to 11 p.m. at Dance Union, 16 Bow St., Union Square, Somerville. $10 to $25. Includes a lesson in the first hour followed by an hour to socialize, rest or practice with a partner before two hours of social dancing. This time, Dan Repsch teaches and DJs. Wear shoes that allow you to pivot; no need to bring a partner. Information is here.

“Beyond Words” (continued) at 7:30 p.m. at Central Square Theater, Cambridge, 450 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, Cambridge. $24 to $78. Information is here.

Improbable Beasts Clarinet Ensemble performs from 7:30 to 10 p.m. at Lilypad, 1353 Cambridge St., Inman Square, Cambridge. $5 to $40. This ensemble of more than a dozen of the most sought-after bass clarinetists in Boston brings the deeply expressive power of multiple bass clarinets to the people, playing anything from Renaissance choral music to brand-new compositions to klezmer tunes and holiday songs. Information is here.

Revive retro music experience from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at ZuZu, 474 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, Cambridge (and the second Thursday of every month). Free and 21-plus. Distortions of electro-swing from DJ Dekichan followed by pop remixes from DJ Catalyst. Information is here.